(via digg)

Updated to include some animated GIFs.

See also: Jordan Bolton’s miniature film set posters

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Movie posters in motion

Wonderful animated movie posters by Pablo Fernández Eyre.

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The Hero’s Journey

Iskander Krayenbosch:

Since the beginning of time people are fascinated by stories of hero’s. But did you know there is a fundamental structure that’s lies beneath all these tales of fantasy. Joseph Campbell, a famous mythologist, was the first to discover similarities within all ancient myths. He called it the Monomyth. According to him there are 17 stages in which every hero has to walk through one way or the other. In the hero’s journey 12 of these stages are visualized by using iconic blockbuster movies that follow the same structure of storytelling.

Continue reading

Everything is a Remix Remastered (2015 HD)

Kirby Ferguson:

In the five years since the series launched, Everything is a Remix has been viewed over two million times and produced a popular TED Talk. Amazingly, Remix continues to change the way people think about creativity, originality, and copyright.

To celebrate the five year anniversary, I’ve polished up the original four parts and merged them into a single video. For the first time now, the whole series is available as a single video with proper transitions all the way through, unified styling, and remixed and remastered audio. Part One has been entirely rebuilt in HD.

You can get some merchandise on Kickstarter, if you feel so inclined.

Over the years there have been many requests for Everything is a Remix merchandise and I’m taking this anniversary as an opportunity to finally produce some. With your support, we’ll do a run of t-shirts and posters. There are no limits, we’ll produce and ship as many as we sell.

Update →

Vancouver Never Plays Itself

Every Frame a Painting: Perhaps no other city has been as thoroughly hidden from modern filmmaking as Vancouver, my hometown. Today, it’s the third biggest film production city in North America, behind Los Angeles and New York. And yet for all the movies and TV shows that are shot there, we hardly ever see the city itself. So today, let’s focus less on the movies and more on the city in the background. Press the CC button to see movie names and locations.

I’d like to visit Vancouver one day. The place has become so familiar to me from shows like The X-Files and Battlestar Galactica.

Vancouver as Caprica

Animation Master Hayao Miyazaki’s Work Comes to Life in This Beautiful 3D Tribute

Made with Blender, Gimp, Octane and Natron, and lots of love for the films of Hayao Miyazaki.

Tribute to Hayao Miyazaki made with Blender 3D

Updated to include this making of video found via the Blender’s ‘User Stories’ blog

Tribute to Hayao Miyazaki – Making of

I found it especially interesting how he was able to edit the entire animation directly in Blender.

See also

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A tribute to Hayao Miyazaki in 3D

Miyazaki has come out of retirement (again) to make an animated short that will only play at the Studio Ghibli Museum that will be entirely computer generated.

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Kathryn Schulz: On being wrong

TED: Most of us will do anything to avoid being wrong. But what if we’re wrong about that? “Wrongologist” Kathryn Schulz makes a compelling case for not just admitting but embracing our fallibility.


No, It’s Not Your Opinion. You’re Just Wrong

Jef Rouner: Before you crouch behind your Shield of Opinion you need to ask yourself two questions.

1. Is this actually an opinion?
2. If it is an opinion, how informed is it and why do I hold it?

I’ll help you with the first part. An opinion is a preference for or judgment of something. My favorite color is black. I think mint tastes awful. Doctor Who is the best television show. These are all opinions. They may be unique to me alone or massively shared across the general population but they all have one thing in common; they cannot be verified outside the fact that I believe them.

There’s nothing wrong with an opinion on those things. The problem comes from people whose opinions are actually misconceptions. If you think vaccines cause autism you are expressing something factually wrong, not an opinion. The fact that you may still believe that vaccines cause autism does not move your misconception into the realm of valid opinion. Nor does the fact that many other share this opinion give it any more validity.

Houston Press: No, It’s Not Your Opinion. You’re Just Wrong

See also:

Beam me up Scotty
Use your words

Churchillian drift: Great quotations find their way to famous names

Aaron Hutchins, Great quote! But who really said it?: William Shatner’s character in Star Trek never said, “Beam me up, Scotty.” The closest he came was: “Beam us up, Mr. Scott.” Quotes often get condensed in people’s memories. “Memory may be a terrible librarian, but it’s a great editor,” writes Ralph Keyes in his book The Quote Verifier.

Great quotations seem to find their way to famous names.
(not) Mark Twain

Nigel Rees, Policing Word Abuse: Long ago, I coined the term “Churchillian Drift” to describe the process whereby the actual originator of a quotation is often elbowed to one side and replaced by someone more famous. So to Churchill or Napoleon would be ascribed what, actually, a lesser-known political figure had said. The process occurs in all fields.

Why are people so culpable when it comes to using quotations? In the run-up to the war in Iraq, Barbra Streisand, the well-known Shakespearean scholar, quoted this and said it came from Julius Caesar: “Beware the leader who bangs the drum for war.” Sheer invention. Why did she do it? Ignorance, laziness or what? It’s impossible to know for sure, but she wanted–as we all do–to use the supposed words of someone better than ourselves to lend weight to her argument.

See also

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Angry Jack
Life on the Internet

Why Are You So Angry?

Ian Danskin (aka Innuendo Studios) has just posted the final part in his six-part series on the male gamer’s relationship to feminism.

Part 1: A Short History of Anita Sarkeesian

The internet is full of Angry Jacks, and Jack is not exclusively, but is typically, male. He’s also commonly white, and/or straight, and/or cis, and/or raised middle class. Which is to say, he usually looks like me.

To people who look like me, Jack is often a nuisance. To people who don’t look like me, Jack is frequently dangerous.

Part 2: Angry Jack

[…] And you’re thinking, or maybe even starting to say, “I shouldn’t have to have this debate right now. I just wanted to go to a fucking party. I’m normal! This is a normal thing to do!” And all she said was “no thanks, I don’t drink,” but that doesn’t matter, what you heard was “you’re a bad person.”

Watch parts 3, 4, 5 & 6 →

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Every Frame a Painting: Chuck Jones

Tony Zhou: If you grew up watching Looney Tunes, then you know Chuck Jones, one of all-time masters of visual comedy. Normally I would talk about his ingenious framing and timing, but not today. Instead, I’d like to explore the evolution of his sensibilities as an artist.


Chuck Jones’ rules for writing Road Runner cartoons

In his book Chuck Amuck: The Life and Times of an Animated Cartoonist, Chuck Jones claimed that he and the artists behind the Road Runner and Wile E. cartoons adhered to some simple but strict rules:

  1. The Road Runner cannot harm the Coyote except by going “meep, meep!”
  2. No outside force can harm the Coyote — only his own ineptitude or the failure of Acme products. Trains and trucks were the exception from time to time.
  3. The Coyote could stop anytime — if he were not a fanatic. (“A fanatic is one who redoubles his effort when he has forgotten his aim.” — George Santayana).
  4. No dialogue ever, except “meep, meep” and yowling in pain.
  5. The Road Runner must stay on the road — for no other reason than that he’s a roadrunner.
  6. All action must be confined to the natural environment of the two characters — the southwest American desert.
  7. All tools, weapons, or mechanical conveniences must be obtained from the Acme Corporation.
  8. Whenever possible, make gravity the Coyote’s greatest enemy.
  9. The Coyote is always more humiliated than harmed by his failures.
  10. The audience’s sympathy must remain with the Coyote.
  11. The Coyote is not allowed to catch or eat the Road Runner.

However, in an interview years after the series was made writer Michael Maltese said he had never heard of these ‘rules’.

(via kottke.org, though it’s interesting to note that the wording varies quite a bit depending on where you find this list, like Mental Floss, Open Culture and Wikipedia.)

Bartkira the Animated Trailer

Bartkira is an animated parody mash-up of The Simpsons and Akira. Based on an idea by Ryan Humphrey articulated through comics, the concept was expanded with the Bartkira project, a comic collaboration of Simpsons fans, curated by James Harvey. In association with the comic, Moon Animate Make-Up producer Kaitlin Sullivan pitched the idea of an animated trailer to match and with the work of over fifty artists, produced the Bartkira animated trailer.

More Bartkira: www.bartkira.com | bartkira.tumblr.com | bartkiraroadshow.tumblr.com

See also: this ‘Akira’ fan made live-action trailer!

The Carbonite Maneuver

An amazing Star Wars/Star Trek mashup by SonOfSpork.

(via kottke)

Hyperallergic: The book is structured after Perry’s lectures, with each chapter exploring a different theme. “Democracy Has Bad Taste” charts the power players of the art world (curators, dealers, critics, etc). “Beating the Bounds” and “Nice Rebellion, Welcome In!” examine shock tactics, the avant-garde, and the market’s co-option of rebellion. The final chapter, “I Found Myself in the Art World,” is a personal account of the artist’s creative principles, as well as a celebration of art education.

“It’s easy to feel insecure around art and its appreciation, as though we cannot enjoy certain artworks if we don’t have a lot of academic and historical knowledge. But if there’s one message that I want you to take away it’s that anybody can enjoy art and anybody can have a life in the arts – even me! For even I, an Essex transvestite potter, have been let in by the artworld mafia.”
Grayson Perry

Craft and creativity

Playing to the Gallery: Helping contemporary art in its struggle to be understood

“Accompanied by 35 David Shrigley–esque illustrations by Perry, the book is presented as a beginner’s guide to the machinations of the art world.” — Hyperallergic

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Business Town

Welcome to Business TownAn ongoing project attempting to explain our highly intangible, deeply disruptive, data-driven, venture-backed, gluten-free economic meritocracy to the uninitiated. With apologies to Richard Scarry. By Tony Ruth (aka @Lunchbreath)
Humans and other animals

Business Town

“An ongoing project attempting to explain our highly intangible, deeply disruptive, data-driven, venture-backed, gluten-free economic meritocracy to the uninitiated.”

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YouTube video removed

What if Man of Steel was IN COLOR?

VideoLab attempts to turn back time and restore the natural color & brightness in shots from DC’s Man of Steel. Turns out there was a beautiful Zack Snyder movie hiding underneath the bleak coloring.

Would Man of Steel have been more successful at the box office if it wasn’t colored like Schindler’s List? What do you think?

Superman should fly in blue skies – not grey ones.

Man of Steel, in colour

The colour grade wasn’t the only thing wrong with Man of Steel, but I like this look much more.

Pantone Minion Yellow
Shape of things to come

Pantone announces new colour: ‘Minion Yellow’

PANTONE Minion Yellow Swatch Card The press release is pretty hilarious too, and not in a deliberate way:

“Just as the sun’s rays enliven us, PANTONE Minion Yellow is a color that heightens awareness and creates clarity, lighting the way to the intelligence, originality and the resourcefulness of an open mind – this is the color of hope, joy and optimism,” said Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director, Pantone Color Institute.

“An extroverted hue, it projects playfulness and warmth and is suggestive of intellectual curiosity and enlightenment.”

Pantone Announces PANTONE Minion Yellow


Now I’m no colour expert at the Pantone Color Institute®, but this officially licensed hue seems a little too pale to my eye. You only have to look at these images of the Minions themselves holding up the Pantone swatch card to see that they’re not exactly the same colour.

Via the highly technical process of using Photoshop’s blur and colour dropper tools for a few minutes I’ve sampled what I think looks like a more Minion-y yellow.

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BuzzFeed
Use your words

The BuzzFeed editorial style guide

Editorial style guides fascinate me, and the BuzzFeed style guide makes for an interesting browse. The word list in particular provides a brilliant snapshot of Internet popular culture as it stands in 2015.

Don’t hyphenate blow job, but do hyphenate butt-dial. Uppercase TARDIS but a subreddit is a lowercase place. T. rex, but T. Swift. Make sure to capitalise Apple Store (and most brands) but you can leave the exclamation mark off of Yahoo.

See also: The BuzzFeed Editorial Standards And Ethics Guide

The BuzzFeed style guide word list →

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This Is Why You Overshop in Ikea

How IKEA gets us to buy more than we need, explained by TIME writer Josh Sanburn.

IKEA “When the question is why do we have so much stuff, one reason is because we can,” says Annie Leonard, executive director of the environmental group Greenpeace USA and the creator of The Story of Stuff, an animated video about excessive consumerism. “For a huge percentage of this country, there is no longer an economic obstacle to having the illusion of luxury. It’s just that this stuff is so cheap.”

The Story of Stuff →

Old-style British Rail logo at Sevenoaks station

The arrows of indecision. The barbed wire. The crow’s feet. In the 50 years since he drew up one of the UK’s most recognisable symbols, designer Gerry Barney has probably heard them all. But he doesn’t mind.

The story of the British Rail symbol began in 1960 when a 21-year-old Barney successfully applied for a job as a lettering artist at the prestigious Design Research Unit (DRU) in London, and quickly established a close working relationship with the studio’s co-founder, Milner Gray. Despite being forty years older than his new employee, Gray seemed to have found a kindred spirit in Barney – he became the first person in the studio permitted to work on the head designer’s drawings, and the first to address him directly by his first name.

“I was a lettering artist, I wasn’t a designer.”

“The designers at DRU were given the brief and, to my knowledge, it didn’t satisfy Milner. So he threw it open to the rest of the studio, six or seven people. I just happened to think of this symbol.”

British Rail identity

Appropriately enough, Barney first sketched the idea ‘on the back of an envelope’ while taking the Tube to work. “When I got to the office I drew it up,” he says. “It was exactly how I drew it the first time, with straighter lines. I just had to formalise it.”

“In the BR [British Rail] symbol, the lines aren’t all the same thickness: where the angled bars meet the horizontal ones they will appear thicker at the join, so they actually widen slightly going out. But that comes from lettering, where you have to pay attention to the counters; the spaces that are left, not the thing you’re drawing. They work together.”

References

See also

Craft and creativity

The untold story of the British Rail logo

Writing of the project in the pages of Design magazine in 1965, Robert Spark reflected on some of the basic visual elements that DRU created for British Rail: the symbol, the logotype and a palette of house colours. These elements would then be applied to every part of the railway system, from locomotives and rolling stock, to stations and offices, signposts, posters and publicity material, uniforms and cutlery. Even by the standards of today’s multimedia applications, it was quite an undertaking.

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Goat Simulator
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Goat Simulator Post Mortem

“It could turn out great, it could also turn out terrible, but in either case, it’ll be really, really interesting.”

Armin Ibrisagic’s Goat Simulator post mortem:

What happens when a joke trailer for a game you had no plans to make goes viral?

Before we released the game, we were unsure of how it would be received once it was out on Steam. Today it’s safe to say that it’s the most successful game we’ve ever made. Perhaps the only thing that was more strange than the game itself was the way it was developed. We’ve made a game in a way we never thought we would, and it actually worked.

What went right:

  1. Used our limited time where it mattered: “We didn’t have that many artists working on Goat Simulator from the start, so we bought most of our assets from the internet. Fun fact: the 3-D model for the actual goat in Goat Simulator cost $25 on TurboSquid. But it was on a 75% off sale, so we got a pretty good deal on it.”
  2. No planning or long-term think: “One of the most important parts of our employees not having a pre-set schedule was that everyone could find some time if they suddenly had an idea for something, or if one of their co-workers had an idea.”
  3. Try really hard to not try too too hard: “After the trailer had received over a million views, we sat down and had a very long design discussion about the future of Goat Simulator. Some of our fans asked us on Twitter to release the game immediately, while others asked for a full-on Grand Theft Auto game where the protagonist is a goat.”
  4. Fan interaction over social media: “I just use the same honest and “don’t try too hard”-approach with our community as we do when it comes to development. I think having this relaxed approach helps us connect much better with our fans.”

What went wrong:

  1. No planning or long-term think: “Once the game was set for release, we had to scramble to finish a Mac and Linux version too. This took a lot of time and effort, and ended up being released several months after the PC version, which I think lost us a big chunk of sales.”
  2. We should have focused on optimization since day one: “The game is way more optimized and smooth today than compared to launch day but sadly, first impressions persist.”
  3. We should have started working on the mobile version earlier: “We basically thought that we would release it on Steam first, and then if that goes well, we’ll release it on mobile. However, only a couple of weeks after the first video of Goat Simulator went viral, there were already clones on the App Store and Google Play that had millions of downloads.”
  4. We should have focused more on Steam Workshop, and promoted it better: “It’s become apparent to us that implementing Steam Workshop is just maybe one third of the work, the other two thirds should be continuous community management of the players making the mods, and updating the modding tools and making them easier to use for everybody.”

“Releasing a game in such a short amount of time is very hard and tricky, but on the other hand, less time to develop a game means less time to mess things up.”
Armin Ibrisagic – Goat Simulator Post Mortem

Watch the epic Goat Simulator Official Launch Trailer →

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Iconic Arms is a series by Stuart Brown on YouTube about legendary weapons in FPS history.

“In games, your gun is player agency made manifest.”

Iconic Arms looks at the history of famous weapons like the double-barreled shotgun, AK-47, M16, the Magnum, their place in popular culture and how their performance characteristics and functionality have been tweaked – sometimes radically – for more balanced gameplay.

Though I’m no fan of guns, I particularly love the graphics in this series with their flat colourful silhouette shapes, bold uber-tightly kerned Helvetica and fast diagonal wipes.

See also

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Iconic Arms: Legendary weapons in FPS history

Stuart Brown’s series about legendary weapons in video game history.

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Negron and Schiavelli
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No Small Parts

No Small Parts is a fan-made documentary series about character actors created by actor Brandon Hardesty. Each episode focuses on one particular character actor’s life and career in entertainment.

Vincent Schiavelli

I particularly loved Episode 2 about Vincent Schiavelli, known for his roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ghost, Man on the Moon, and countless other films and television shows throughout the 70s, 80s, 90s, and 00s.

Remembering Taylor Negron

“After 30 years in show business I’ve given up on the idea that people will know my first and last name together, and I’ve accepted that I will never, ever be actually famous.
“Instead, I am fame-ish.”
Taylor Negron

Further reading: A Last Gift From The Genius Mind of Taylor Negron: Reflections On A Life Spent Playing Everyman

See also:

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This Video Will Make You Angry

CGP Grey on how ideas spread as ‘thought germs’ (memes in the traditional sense) over the internet, how these ideas use our emotions to survive longer and how ‘opposing thought germs’ (divisive ideas) can survive indefinitely.


In a similar vein, here is a near-future startup promo video by Tom Scott:
The Bubble: imagine the web without trolls, or shocks, or spam

What if you could have a perfect filter for the web? Anything you’d regret seeing or reading: it’s gone before you even see it. Welcome to the Bubble.

“Everything being made here is always being rushed out the door because I always have to fuckin’ make money.”

“Corners are cut everywhere and that just materialises in the product. I was smart to build that into the brand and make that the chief aesthetic.” Sucklord

(via Boing Boing)

Craft and creativity

The Sucklord, maker of bootleg mashup action figures

Joey Garfield spends an afternoon with The Sucklord, talking Star Wars, Gay Rights, and why Super Villains have the upper hand.

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In this exclusive interview, TrekCore sits down with Smithsonian Air & Space Museum curator Margaret Weitekamp and chief conservator Malcolm Collum to discuss the ongoing conservation project to preserve the original “Star Trek” USS Enterprise filming model for future generations.

This video, and the gallery on Trek Core, contains some of the best reference material I’ve seen of the original Enterprise model. I’m suddenly itching to try my hand at building another CGI version of this classic starship.

See also: this incredible 1.5m USS Enterprise made from LEGO and other posts tagged ‘Star Trek’.

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The USS Enterprise at the Smithsonian

“Thanks to the generous access provided by the Smithsonian team, TrekCore went behind the public barriers to get some of the most detailed imagery of the starship available.”

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Think Country Music Sounds The Same? You’re Absolutely Right

A mashup of six popular country music hits:

  • “Sure Be Cool If You Did”- Blake Shelton
  • “Drunk on You”- Luke Bryan
  • “Chillin’ It”- Cole Swindell
  • “Close Your Eyes”- Parmalee
  • “This is How We Roll”- Florida Georgia Line
  • “Ready, Set, Roll”- Chase Rice

Sir Mashalot says:

“As an aspiring songwriter/producer living in Nashville who, like so many, has had a hard time getting a bite from the “gate keepers”, my current experiment is working on a song specifically designed to become the 7th entry to this mashup formula (hence the “To Be Continued” at the end of the video). I figure hey, at the very least, they won’t be able to say it doesn’t sound like a hit!”

Circle 7's Toy Story 3

In 2004, the partnership between Disney and Pixar came to an end, due to a feud between Pixar’s CEO Steve Jobs and Disney’s CEO Michael Eisner. Disney, who owned the rights to all of Pixar’s films, quickly established their own Pixar-like animation studio, Circle 7, and began working on sequels, including Finding Nemo 2, Monsters Inc. 2, and Toy Story 3.

In 2006, after a deal was struck between Jobs and Disney’s new CEO Bob Iger, Circle 7 Animation was shutdown, and all the sequels they had been working on scrapped.

The plot for Circle 7’s abandoned film was radically different to the Toy Story 3 that eventually hit cinemas in 2010. The script, by Meet The Parents writer Jim Herzfeld , sees the toys become concerned after spaceman action figure Buzz Lightyear begins to malfunction. Anxious to help Buzz, cowboy doll Woody and the rest of the toys decide to ship him to the Taiwanese factory where he was made, in the hopes that his makers will be able to repair him.

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The Toy Story 3 you never saw

In 2004, the partnership between Disney and Pixar came to an end. Disney quickly established their own Pixar-like animation studio, Circle 7, and began working on sequels, including Toy Story 3. — The Telegraph

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