Xavi Bou

If Birds Left Tracks in the Sky, They’d Look Like This

National Geographic: If birds left tracks in the sky, what would they look like? For years Barcelona-based photographer Xavi Bou has been fascinated by this question.

Ultimately he chose to work with a video camera, from which he extracts high-resolution photographs. After he films the birds in motion, Bou selects a section of the footage and layers the individual frames into one image.

This current work, he says, combines his passion and his profession. “It’s technical, challenging, artistic, and natural. It’s the connection between photography and nature that I was looking for.”

See also

Humans and other animals

Ornitografías: If birds left tracks in the sky…

Photographer Xavi Bou captures the paths that birds make across the sky.

Gallery

Quietly tucked away in a few unassuming buildings in lower Manhattan, massive flows of data pulse through some of the world’s largest and most heavily guarded hubs of global internet infrastructure.

​Peter Garritano is a photographer based in New York City.

See also

  • The seven keys to the internet“It sounds like the stuff of science fiction: seven keys, held by individuals from all over the world, that together control security at the core of the web. James Ball joins a private ceremony, and finds the reality is rather closer to The Office than The Matrix.”
  • Ye olde submarine cable mapTeleGeography’s Submarine Cable Map has been updated for 2015. The latest edition depicts 299 cable systems that are currently active, under construction, or expected to be fully-funded by the end of 2015.
  • The 10 Immutable Laws of Computer Security, by Scott Culp c.2000
Life on the Internet

Peter Garritano’s photographs of Internet infrastructure in New York

“Quietly tucked away in a few unassuming buildings in lower Manhattan, massive flows of data pulse through some of the world’s largest and most heavily guarded hubs of global internet infrastructure.”

Gallery

Hitler rehearsing, 1925

Mashable: Hitler asked his personal photographer Heinrich Hoffmann to take photos of him rehearsing speeches. Hitler would try out various gestures and expressions, then review the pictures to see if his postures looked stunning or stupid.

Though Hitler ordered Hoffmann to destroy the pictures for being “beneath one’s dignity,” the photographer kept them in his studio. He later published the photos in his memoir, Hitler Was My Friend.

See also: Hitler was high during most of World War II

Humans and other animals

Hitler rehearsing

“One of Hitler’s best talents was oration. He first developed his acumen for public speaking in beer halls, where his rants would start out cool and precise, then escalate into hypnotic histrionics as his audience became more engaged (and drunk).”

Gallery

Juno Perijove — Jupiter Flyby

A wonderful video by Seán Doran putting recent imagery from the Juno spacecraft to György Ligeti’s Atmosphères, famously used in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

From the original video: This computer animation uses the JunoCam images of PJ-05 as textures, and SPICE trajectory data in order to reconstruct the flyby as seen from Juno’s perspective.

Above: Edits by Seán Doran // Below: as featured on APOD

On May 19, the Juno spacecraft once again swung by Jupiter in its looping 53 day orbit around the Solar System’s ruling gas giant.

Perijove Passage

APOD: Beginning at the top, this vertical 14 frame sequence of enhanced-color JunoCam images follows the spacecraft’s rapidly changing perspective during its two hour passage. They look down on Jupiter’s north polar region, equatorial, and south polar region (bottom images). With the field-of-view shrinking, the seventh and eighth images in the sequence are close-up. Taken only 4 minutes apart above Jupiter’s equator they were captured just before the spacecraft reached perijove 6, its closest approach to Jupiter on this orbit. Final images in the sequence pick up white oval storm systems, Jupiter’s “String of Pearls”, and the south polar region from the outward bound spacecraft.

See also

Light-based media

By Jove! Spectacular new views of Jupiter

On May 19, the Juno spacecraft once again swung by Jupiter in its looping 53 day orbit around the Solar System’s ruling gas giant.

Gallery

Still File

…is a series of 4 photographs recreating computer renderings as physical scenes by Skrekkøgle, a product and digital design studio in Oslo.

Cube, sphere and cone geometry with material textures mahogany, clear glass and white marble. Placed on reflective checkers plane.

Floating colored cube without environment. Low greyscale resolution creates gradient banding in background.

Three white Utah teapots – scaled, rotated, intersected and distorted. Diffuse lighting, composed on matte yellow plane.

Patterned spheres with pink metallic texture. Panoramic photo of a beach added on cylindrical environment, mirrored in both the base plane and in the metal spheres.

See also: Other posts tagged ‘3D’ and ‘CGI’.

Light-based media

Still File: Real recreations of computer renderings

The photos’ artifacts, surroundings, camera settings and lighting has been shaped intending to resemble 3d graphics of different types.

Gallery

The Mammoth Pirates

Amos Chapple (RFE/RL): With the sale of elephant tusks under close scrutiny, “ethical ivory” from the extinct woolly mammoth is now feeding an insatiable market in China. This rush on mammoth ivory is luring a fresh breed of miner – the tusker – into the Russian wilderness and creating dollar millionaires in some of the poorest villages of Siberia.

The Mammoth Pirates

This 65-kilogram tusk, photographed a moment after it was plucked from the permafrost, was sold for $34,000. The two men who found it unearthed three more in just over a week, including one weighing 72 kilograms.

Ravaged landscape is the obvious result of the tusk hunters’ methods, but the impact on Yakutia’s waterways is far-reaching.

See also

Progression and regression

The Mammoth Pirates

On condition that he not reveal names or exact locations, RFE/RL photographer Amos Chapple gained exclusive access to one site where between bouts of vodka-fueled chaos and days spent evading police patrols, teams of men are using illegal new methods in the hunt for what remains of Siberia’s lost giants.

Gallery

SLO: 3D Printed Camera

SLO: 3D Printed Camera

Amos Dudley made made his own 3D printed camera, with lens.
He has even made the design files available for download so you can print your own.

SLO is a single lens objective. SLO is the mechanical shutter. SLO is the speed of good design, and the feeling of capturing life with a camera you made yourself.

A 3D printed camera body could look like anything, but I decided to optimize the design for printing speed and material usage. Most of the larger parts are designed without overhangs in one orientation, so they can be printed without supports, straight off the build platform. Separating the body into modules let me prototype each component individually. The shutter and lens are modules, and can be swapped out for different designs without reprinting the entire camera.

Creating a lens with a 3D printer is a challenge – your typical FDM printer won’t cut it here. […] The result was mixed- the lenses looked transparent, but weren’t optically sharp. Surface reflections were still blurry, which is a sign that a surface still has microscopic grooves that scatter light.

There’s no adjustment for shutter speed, except for the speed the button is pressed by your finger.

Photo taken with the SLO 3D printed camera

Photo taken with the SLO 3D printed camera

See more photos taken with the SLO on Flickr, shot on Fujicolor Superia 400.

35mm is the most common film standard, and the natural choice for the SLO. It’s also the only film size that’s still relatively easy to get developed at a reasonable price. The choice of a film size informs many aspects of a camera’s design and function.

(via HN)

See also

Light-based media

SLO: 3D Printed Camera

“The design of the camera body evolved from a simplified massing of functional elements to refinements based on ergonomics and scale, as I learned more about the strength of the material.” — Amos Dudley

Gallery

Exploring Fukushima's Red Exclusion Zone

When i enter the red zone, i can feel a burning sensation in my eyes and thick chemical smell in the air. before i went there the authority told me that i need a special permit to visit this town and it take 3-4 weeks to get the approval from the local council,, well too much bureaucracy bullshit for me..so i just sneak in the forest to avoid cops on the road …AND IT WAS AMAZING !!!!!

The radiation level is still very high in the red zone. not many people seen this town for the last 5 years…is like it vanished … i can find food,money,gold,laptop and other valuable in the red zone….I’m amaze that nobody looted this town clean.

(via reddit)

See also

Humans and other animals

Man wearing gas mask and sandals explores Fukushima’s Exclusion Zone

“Gas mask and sandals. Seems legit. What is he, level one character that didn’t find gear yet?” — commenter ‘ondaheightsofdespair’ on imgur.

Gallery

Cristian Lascu (left)

BBC Earth: Movile Cave has been cut off for millions of years. Its air is thick with harmful gases, yet it is home to an array of strange animals.

Despite a complete absence of light and a poisonous atmosphere, the cave is crawling with life. There are unique spiders, scorpions, woodlice and centipedes, many never before seen by humans, and all of them owe their lives to a strange floating mat of bacteria.

Strangely, the worse the air gets the more animals there are. It’s not at all obvious why that should be, or how the animals survive at all.

Without any signs of water reaching the deep cave from the surface, it is unclear how the animals in the cave survives. Tests have shown that the water flowing in does not contain any food particles. Instead, the food comes from the strange frothy foam sitting on top of the water. This floating film, which looks like wet tissue paper and can even be torn like paper, contains millions upon millions of bacteria known as “autotrophs”.

In 1996, researchers categorised the animals in the cave. They included 3 species of spider, a centipede, 4 species of isopod (the group that includes woodlice), a leech never seen anywhere else in the world, and an unusual-looking insect called a waterscorpion.

See also

Humans and other animals

Movile Cave: The unique life isolated deep underground for 5.5 million years

“Almost 30 years after its discovery, Movile Cave remains perhaps the most isolated ecosystem on the planet. It surely has many more secrets to give up. There are plenty more organisms buried in the cave’s sediments, waiting to be identified, and they could help us understand some of our deepest questions about the nature of life.” — BBC Earth

Gallery

Guide to Computing

This colourful series of ten historic computers, created in close collaboration between INK and Docubyte, documents the beginning of our computing history.

Featuring such famous machines as the IBM 1401 and Alan Turing’s Pilot ACE, Guide to Computing showcases a minimalist approach to design that precedes even Apple’s contemporary motifs.

What’s more, the combination of Docubyte’s photography and INK’s skilful retouching and post-production techniques has resulted in something wholly unique: the ageing historical objects as photographed by Docubyte have been ‘digitally restored’ and returned to their original form. As a number of these computers predate modern colour photography, Guide to Computing therefore showcases them in a never before seen context.

Photography by Docubyte. Retouching by INK.

See also

Miscellany

Colourful digital restorations of historic computers

This colourful series of ten historic computers, created in close collaboration between INK and Docubyte, documents the beginning of our computing history.

Gallery

Canon’s The Lab: Decoy – A portrait session with a twist

A photograph is shaped more by the person behind the camera than by what’s in front of it. To prove this we invited six photographers to a portrait session with a twist. ‘Decoy’ is one of six experiments from The Lab, designed to shift creative thinking behind the lens.

A portrait session with a twist

Each photographer was told a different story about the life of their subject. Can you tell which image is of the millionaire, the recovering alcoholic, the lifesaver, the ex-con, the fisherman or the psychic?

THE LAB: DECOY - A portrait session with a twist

(via kottke)

See also

Project Apollo Archive
Thousands of high-resolution (3200DPI) Apollo images scanned by NASA’s Johnson Space Center.

Here (in no particular order) are about sixty of my favourites picked from a quick trip through the 9,200 on offer!

See the rest of the Project Apollo Archive that caught my eye →

Light-based media

Project Apollo Archive

The Project Apollo Archive serves as an online reference source and repository of digital images pertaining to the historic manned lunar landing program.

Gallery

Dmitry Pisanko ISS timelapse

Dmitry Pisanko downloaded 95,623 publicly available raw images from taken from the International Space Station – that’s 109 Gigabytes worth – and after some post-production in Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects created this incredible 4K timelapse spectacle.

The part which took the longest was finding the appropriate soundtrack to accompany the video; Dmitry said it took “a long time, prohibitively long, almost three months”, but once he came across ‘Experience’ by Ludovico Einaudi he knew he had finally found what he was looking for.

(via DIY Photography)

Light-based media

Stunning 4K timelapse of Earth from the ISS

Dmitry Pisanko’s 4K timelapse spectacular of Earth using NASA source material. One of the most stunning space films I’ve seen to be sure.

Gallery

A daily photo project by JK Keller (1998–2014)

The project began out of spite. I had just purchased a digital camera (Nikon CoolPix 900), and it was rather expensive. My girlfriend at the time asked me why I bought it and what I was going to do with it. I explained. She seemed unconvinced and asked if I was “going to use it every day” with sarcastic inflection. I told her yes, and resolved to do so. Inception! (From the FAQ)

JK Keller

These photographs were taken by National Geographic Society photographers using early Autochrome, the first commercially available color photographic process.

See also

Light-based media

American Autochromes: Early 20th century colour photography

National Geographic Society photographers eventually moved on to other slightly more advanced photographic processes and finally to Kodachrome by 1938, but not before amassing a collection of more than 12,000 Autochromes.

Gallery

Watchtower of Turkey

By Leonardo Dalessandri:

Over than 3500 km traveled in 20 days, capturing landscapes from the bluish tones of Pamukkale to the warm ones of Cappadocia, the all passing by a great variation of colors, lights and weathers through six other cities.

I’ve crossed Cappadocia, Pamukkale, Ephesus, Istanbul, Konya; and tasted baklava, kunefe, doner, the turkish tea; and got the chance to meet the soul of Turkey, its people.. and got their smiles and their hospitality.

This is Turkey lived by me from north to south, and I hope you enjoy it 🙂

See also: Watchtower of Morocco

Kate Parker first started photographing her girls several years ago, with the hope of teaching them that “Whatever you are…that’s okay.”

See also

Light-based media

Strong is the new pretty

“There’s a lot of pressure for girls (and women) to look a certain way, act in a certain manner, and I wanted to let my daughters know that who they naturally are is enough.” — Kate Parker

Gallery

Slow Life, by Daniel Stoupin

The most important living organisms that play the key functions in the biosphere might not seem exciting when it comes to motion. Plants, fungi, sponges, corals, plankton, and microorganisms make life on Earth possible and do all the hard biochemical job. Similarly to all living things, they are dynamic, mobile, and fundamentally have the same motion properties as us. They grow, reproduce, spread, move towards source of energy, and away from unfavorable conditions. However, their speeds happen to be out of sync with our narrow perception. Our brains are wired to comprehend and follow fast and dynamic events better, especially those very few that happen at speeds comparable to ours. In a world of blazingly fast predators and escaping prey events where it takes minutes, hours, or days to notice any changes are harder to grasp.

“Slow” marine life is particularly mysterious. As colorful, bizarre-looking, and environmentally important as we know corals and sponges are, their simple day-to-day life is hidden. We know some bits about their biochemistry, corals’ interaction with zooxanthella algae, their life cycles, and systematics. Unfortunately, it’s hard to tell what we don’t know about the rest, and particularly when it comes to interaction with other organisms happening over long periods of time.

Time lapse cinematography reveals a whole different world full of hypnotic motion and my idea was to make coral reef life more spectacular and thus closer to our awareness. I had a bigger picture in my mind for my clip. But after many months of processing hundreds of thousands of photos and trying to capture various elements of coral and sponge behavior I realized that I have to take it one step at a time. For now, the clip just focuses on beauty of microscopic reef “landscapes.” The close-up patterns and colors of this type of fauna hardly resemble anything from the terrestrial environments. Corals become even less familiar if you consider their daily “activities.” — Daniel Stoupin

(via Mental Floss)

See also: Wellcome Image Awards 2015: The art behind the science of life, death, sex, and disease and other posts tagged photography.

Humans and other animals

Timelapse: The “slow life” of a coral reef, sped up

“Slow” marine animals show their secret life under high magnification. Corals and sponges build coral reefs and play crucial roles in the biosphere, yet we know almost nothing about their daily lives. These animals are actually very mobile creatures, however their motion is only detectable at different time scales compared to ours and requires time lapses to be seen.

Gallery
Earthrise restored

Direct comparison of the original photo to the restored version

Between 1966 and 1967 NASA sent five Lunar Orbiter spacecraft to the Moon. Images from these spacecraft were used by mission planners to select the Apollo landing sites.

The Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) is a project funded by NASA, SkyCorp, SpaceRef Interactive, and private individuals to digitize the original analog data tapes from the five Lunar Orbiter spacecraft that were sent to the Moon in 1966 and 1967

The first image to be successfully recovered by the project was released in November 2008. It was the first photograph of the Earth from the Moon, taken in August 1966.

More

See also

Light-based media

The Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project

The Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP) is a project to digitise the original analog data tapes from the five Lunar Orbiter spacecraft that were sent to the Moon in 1966 and 1967.

Gallery

The Wellcome Image Awards 2015: Showcasing the best in science imaging talent and techniques, this year’s Wellcome Image Awards winners include: a scanning electron micrograph of a greenfly’s eye; a clinical photograph of an elderly woman’s curved spine; an illustration of pollen grains; a confocal micrograph showing drug-carrying particles in the lungs of a mouse; and a picture that shows the intricacies of a paediatric multi-sensory unit.

“The breath-taking riches of the imagery that science generates are so important in telling stories about research and helping us to understand often abstract concepts. It’s not just about imaging the very small either. It’s about understanding life, death, sex, and disease: the cornerstones of drama and art.”
Adam Rutherford, scientist and judge for the Wellcome Image Awards

See also:

Light-based media

Wellcome Image Awards 2015: The art behind the science of life, death, sex, and disease

The Wellcome Image Awards showcase the best in science imaging talent and techniques. “This year’s selection of winning images is not only beautiful, they bring to life an incredible array of innovative imaging techniques, and hint at stories and ideas that go beyond the visual.” — Catherine Draycott, head of Wellcome Images

Gallery

Planetfall cover

The startling majesty – and deceptive complexity – of Michael Benson’s space art can be traced back through a process he dubs “true color.”
Time: The Cosmos In Living Color: Michael Benson’s Interstellar Imagery

Benson is a visual stylist with a gift for framing and focus. Apart from cutting-edge high-definition renderings of our solar system’s most familiar objects, he also routinely converts extra-terrestrial terrain into thrilling, abstract landscapes that seem positioned somewhere between the scientific and the avant-garde.

“At least with this particular subject matter, I usually try to give as accurate a representation as possible of what the human eye might see if we could travel to these places ourselves.”
Michael Benson — Slate: Curating the Cosmos

See also

  • Gordon Ugarkovic’s spectacular take on NASA’s Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan.
  • A Look Behind the Future — This fascinating documentary featurette looks at the production of Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey and also the Apollo programme, which had yet to put man on the moon.
  • Waltz Around Saturn with this video showing highlights from Cassini’s exploration of the giant planet, its magnificent rings, and fascinating family of moons.
  • …and other posts tagged ‘space
Light-based media

Planetfall: New Solar System Visions

“Michael Benson is a man utterly fascinated with outer space and he has fixed his talents on creating visions that break free of the confines of Earth, enabling viewers to behold the unseen wonders of the universe.” — Time

Gallery

Flipped Iceberg: Shooting in Antarctica

Alex Cornell: This is a behind-the-scenes video of the flipped iceberg photos we shot in Antarctica. The video includes an overview of the gear used, a Lightroom editing screencast, some unreleased video of the iceberg, and a brief rundown of press outreach and monitoring viral analytics.

Flipped iceberg in Antarctica -- Alex Cornell

(via Daring Fireball)

My picks of the best pics of 2014

The Guardian’s features picture editor Sarah Gilbert selects the most compelling images of 2014:

The Atlantic’s 2014: The Year in Photos, part 1, part 2, part 3:

Buzzfeed’s “74 Of The Most Amazing News Photos Of 2014”:

Time’s Top 10 Photos of 2014 and Top 100 Photos of 2014:

Wired’s The Year’s Most Awesome Photos of Space and NASA’s Best Images of Earth From Space in 2014:

For me some of the most iconic (and depressing) images came from the Mike Brown / Police brutality protests in Ferguson. Of those images, one stands out as particularly memorable:

Perhaps the icon of their fledgling movement is a dreadlocked man identified on Twitter only as @eyeFLOODpanties, who was photographed throwing a tear gas canister while wearing an American flag T-shirt and holding a bag of potato chips. The picture, taken last week by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s Robert Cohen, has inspired countless T-shirts and posters. “I didn’t realize how big this was!” he tweeted after his identity was revealed and he gained thousands of Twitter followers.
Buzzfeed: Ferguson’s Angry Young Men

But the man with the chips, who was photographed during protests in Ferguson on Wednesday night, wants you to know he wasn’t throwing it at police. He was throwing it away.

“I don’t think ‘da man wit the chips’ was throwing it back at police. I think he was throwing it away from him and kids he was standing near,” said the man, who goes by the Twitter name @eyeFLOODpanties.
Mashable: ‘Da Man Wit the Chips’ in Iconic Ferguson Photo Identified

(PS: Check out the other posts on this blog tagged ‘photography’)

Light-based media

The best photos of 2014

My picks of the best pics of 2014

Gallery

Saturn mosaic 2008-04-06

The images you see here are (more or less) calibrated images that were released to the Planetary Data System, they are not raw jpeg processed images that immediately appear on the mission website as they’re downlinked from the spacecraft. The downside of the PDS is the data releases are delayed about 9 months in order to give the imaging team priority over analyzing data (hey, they built the cameras!). Other than that, the PDS data allow more accurate reconstruction of colors and brightnesses over the histogram-stretched jpeg images.

I’ve put up this gallery because I was somewhat underwhelmed by the frequency the Cassini Imaging Team releases color composites. Granted, there isn’t an overwhelming number of color sets available, but even when there is a chance to do color, the team often prefers grayscale. –Gordon Ugarkovic

(via io9)

Light-based media

Gordon Ugarkovic’s pictures of Saturn and her moons

Gordon Ugarkovic wanted nicer images from the Cassini mission to Saturn and the Huygens Titan probe. So he made them using nasa’s own data.

Gallery

Though race is one of those seismic issues—the stuff of movements and monuments and multiday conferences at top universities—the moments revealed in the six-word submissions are smaller in nature and much more intimate:

Brown-skinned mothers who are mistaken as the nannies of their lighter skinned children.

Blue-eyed teenagers who grow outsize afros to win easy (or at least easier) acceptance on the basketball court.

Asians with Irish last names who delight at seeing the faces of potential employers when they show up for job interviews.

And blonde women who understand why their children choose to identify as “Black-tino” out of cultural convenience but quietly die inside because they feel rejected or left out. This is all part of the crazy quilt of America. Our diversity is the marvel of the world and represents one of our greatest strengths as a nation. It heralds progress but not without pain for those who live on the knife-edge of multiple cultures.

(via @picpedant)

Humans and other animals, Shape of things to come

Visualising race, identity and change

“Official statistics can paint a useful picture. Appearance is an important aspect of the story. But to understand race—and more specifically racial ambiguity—it helps to understand those whose lives are defined by it.” — National Geographic

Gallery

TIME assigned conflict photographer Ashley Gilbertson to document the zombie apocalypse, as seen in The Last of Us on the PlayStation 4.

The Last of Us

My approach was to enter each situation, or level, and work the scene until I was confident I’d gotten the best photograph I could before moving on. It’s the same way I work in real life. Yet, I found it was more difficult to do in a virtual reality because I was expected to fight my way through these levels to get to the next situations.

I initially played the game at home. But after a short time playing it, I noticed I was having very strong reactions in regards to my role as the protagonist: I hated it. When I covered real war, I did so with a camera, not a gun. At home, I’d play for 30 minutes before noticing I had knots in my stomach, that my vision blurred, and then eventually, that I had simply crashed out. I felt like this could well be my last assignment for TIME.

None of the game’s characters show distress, and that to me was bizarre.

Occasionally the characters show anger, though generally they’re nonchalant about the situation they’ve found themselves in.

By the time I finished this assignment, watching the carnage had became easier.

TIME: A War Photographer Embeds Himself Inside a Video Game

Update: A harsh, but I think fair perspective from The Verge: An award-winning war photographer futilely attempts video game photojournalism

The photos, even at their most dramatic and well-shot, are bland.

Continue reading

Light-based media

TIME embeds a war photographer in a zombie apocalypse (on the PS4)

“I left the experience with a sense that by familiarizing and desensitizing ourselves to violence like this can turn us into zombies. Our lack of empathy and unwillingness to engage with those involved in tragedy stems from our comfort with the trauma those people are experiencing.” — Ashley Gilbertson

Image

Vincent Debanne, Battleship

Battleship is a photo series by artist Vincent Debanne:

“I show this gathering of yachts as a naval battle, because that’s what it is, a balance of power, a fight. Photomontage gives me the opportunity to reveal, to exaggerate this underlying violence, the violence of economic war.”

“My photo series always play with realism: the documentary side of my images is essential. It has to be plausible at first sight. That’s because my work is not fanciful but seeks to interrogate reality, often in a sociological and political perspective. It engages in a dialectical relationship with reality.”

(via Creative Applications)

Shape of things to come

Battleships for the super rich

Vincent Debanne uses image manipulation to turn luxury yachts into formidable warships and the bays of Antibes and of St-Tropez into theaters of war, while also providing a commentary on some of our world’s current economic, social and political issues.

Gallery

A respectful homage to Shirow Masamune’s manga and Mamoru Oshii’s seminal film “Ghost in the Shell”

For a film that was a comment on the uber-connected society of the future, Project 2501 ended up being itself an example of how this collaborative group of creatives are so connected ourselves. Many of us never met beyond the communications provided by the vast and infinite net, but still came together to make the ultimate tribute to “Ghost in the Shell”

gits2501.com (via DN)

Light-based media

Project 2501: A homage to ‘Ghost in the Shell’

This is a modernised direction that still tries to stays true to the original creator’s vision. What started as a photo tribute directed by Ash Thorp and Tim Tadder (photography), soon became a worldwide collaboration of more than 20 artists from around the world, with each and every one coming together to help breathe life into the project.

Gallery
Light-based media

Otto: A customizable camera powered by Raspberry Pi

Meet Otto, a hackable GIF camera powered by a Raspberry Pi. It’s on Kickstarter now and costs either $149 or $199, depending on how quickly you get your pre-order in.

I really like this Otto prototype photograph that appears on the Next Thing website:

Otto prototype camera

I think this could be the inspiration I needed for my own Raspberry Pi project!

(via raspberrypi.org)

Previously on Rapid Notes

Update →

Standard