Dogs of the World

366 Dogs and Their Countries of Origin

A wonderful illustration by Lili Chin who has a whole series of posters for sale for dog and cat lovers.

See also: Urbano Monte’s remarkable 430-year-old map of the world

Humans and other animals

Map of the Dogs of the World

A wonderful infographic illustration by Lili Chin.

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Daily papers: an artist’s crafty emojis

The Guardian: Kashia Kennedy uses a scalpel, tweezers and double-sided tape to create these tiny works, which easily fit in the palm of a hand for her #emojieveryday on Instagram.

“For some reason in 80-plus days I haven’t been able to bear the thought of skipping a day. I’d be so annoyed with myself.”


The inventor of emoji on his famous creations

The Guardian: MoMA in New York has just added the first emoji to their collection – Shigetaka Kurita explains how he designed them.

The original set of 176 emojis, acquired by MoMA

“I was part of a team that spent about two years designing the first emoji for the launch of i-mode [NTT DoCoMo’s mobile internet system] in 1999. It limited users to up to 250 characters in an email, so we thought emoji would be a quick and easy way for them to communicate. Plus using only words in such a short message could lead to misunderstandings … It’s difficult to express yourself properly in so few characters.”


[Updated: Making this a Guardian / emoji trifecta post.]

The Emojibator: how a euphemistic fruit became an actual sex toy

The idea of turning an eggplant (emoji-speak for penis) into a vibrator started out as a late-night joke. Now founder Jaime Jandler can’t make enough.

The Emojibator

“Our mission is to destigmatize masturbation and promote healthy sexuality” – one emoji-themed sex toy at a time. “We don’t think sex needs to be taken seriously all the time,” he added. “So we’ll make more unique products that are both intimate and silly.”

See also

  • That emoji does not mean what you think it means — Since emoji are designed differently across platforms, sometimes your text messages might get lost in translation.
  • 100 new emoji, by Avery Monsen — featuring: ‘A Box Which Must Never Be Opened’, ‘Three Worms Pretending To Be One Long Worm’ and ‘A Spectre Rises From A Seven Layer Fiesta Dip’.
Craft and creativity

Kashia Kennedy’s #emojieveryday & Shigetaka Kurita talks about designing the original emojis & Jaime Jandler’s ‘Emojibator’

“I don’t accept that the use of emoji is a sign that people are losing the ability to communicate with words, or that they have a limited vocabulary. And it’s not even a generational thing … People of all ages understand that a single emoji can say more about their emotions than text. Emoji have grown because they meet a need among mobile phone users.” — Shigetaka Kurita

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Archicards

Architectural playing card designs by Italian architect Federico Babina.

“When I was young, I used to build a house with cards: why not use architecture to design cards?”

(via The Guardian)

See also

Craft and creativity

Architectural playing cards

“Maybe I use a building or a window… something that represents them. If you look at a simple detail of the cards you can find the architect” — Federico Babina in The Guardian

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Chun-li animation
Light-based media

Pixel artist renounces pixel art

“While they look a bit pixelated, the character models look quite good” –IGN review of KOF XIII

King of Fighters XIII

“Quite good”

This sprite is not “quite good.” It’s among the best 2D animation ever made in a video game. However good it is, it’s good in spite of it being “pixelated” according to many.

Blake Reynolds of Dinofarm Games was a pixel art purist. In this post he explains his recent change of heart.

The challenge was always in conveying to a lay person how lower fidelity artwork can be of higher quality than the apparently superior new product…

[…] it is easy to explain that the second image has a higher level of technology. Some may even be so taken with the spectacle of added color and resolution that they might mistakenly think Bubsy has the better artwork.

I could write you an entire book on why that is absolutely not the case, but that’s the thing – it’s not the audience’s responsibility to read that book. It’s my responsibility deliver them quality in a language they understand.

As for the future, I’m planning to shed purism and do my best to mature. I plan to embrace the medium, whatever that may be, and make the best art I possibly can.

Working in high resolution doesn’t prevent us from making great game art. The things that made pixel art great are the same things that make “HD” art great. Artists must make the decisions, not computers.

Continue reading

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Untranslatable Words by Marija Tiurina

Selected from a series of illustrations by artist Marija Tiurina of “Untranslatable Words” containing fourteen detailed illustrations that convey moments and ideas which no single English word can describe.

See also: Artist Interview: Catching Up with Marija Tiurina

“There are certain viral “lists” that are fun to illustrate, they create a base for a nice and fun set of images. I just wanted to take a fun theme that people always have interest in when browsing the web, and illustrate my own vision of these untranslatable concepts.”

Use your words

Untranslatable words

“One million, twenty five thousand, one hundred and nine, a number so huge, it is one of a kind! It’s the number of words in the language of English, one for every person, place, animal, and trinket. But there are certain words, which here don’t exist…”

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Business Town

Welcome to Business TownAn ongoing project attempting to explain our highly intangible, deeply disruptive, data-driven, venture-backed, gluten-free economic meritocracy to the uninitiated. With apologies to Richard Scarry. By Tony Ruth (aka @Lunchbreath)
Humans and other animals

Business Town

“An ongoing project attempting to explain our highly intangible, deeply disruptive, data-driven, venture-backed, gluten-free economic meritocracy to the uninitiated.”

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The Heart of Canyonlands National Park, Utah

A gorgeous map by Tom Patterson:

At the ICA Mountain Cartography Workshop held in Banff, Alberta, I introduced two prototype maps made in part with Terrain Texture Shader software. Both maps feature textures rendered from digital elevation models that resemble the hand-drawn rock hachures found on topographic maps of the Alps. The new rock texturing technique works best on cliffy landscapes with horizontal strata.

Brad Washburn’s 1978 The Heart of the Grand Canyon, co-produced with National Geographic and with contributions from SwissTopo, inspired the making of this map. The arid-land textures derive from shaded relief, texture shading, and NAIP aerial photos blended together. The river rapids are the only manual element, which I painted in Adobe Photoshop using NAIP as a guide.

As a bonus, this map is in the public domain so you may use it however you wish, including commercially!

(via Wired: Cartographic Arts: Beautiful Maps From the Atlas of Design)

See also: Other posts on this blog tagged ‘maps’.

Craft and creativity

Canyonlands National Park texture and shaded relief map

“National Park Service cartographer Tom Patterson is a master of texture and shaded relief. He’s released this gorgeous map of Canyonlands National to the public domain.” — Wired

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Magic Highway

Paleo-Future:

Kevin Kidney has uploaded some amazing Magic Highway, U.S.A. images taken straight from publicity stills of the era.

(via Overhead Compartment)

Craft and creativity

Magic Highway

“On May 14, 1958 the Disneyland TV program ran an episode called “Magic Highway, U.S.A.” It examined the past, present and (paleo)future of transportation.” — Paleo-Future

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Europe from the southwest - Richard Edes Harrison

More Americans came into contact with maps during the Second World War than in any previous moment in American history. War has perennially driven interest in geography, but World War Two was different. The urgency of the war, coupled with the advent of aviation, fuelled the demand not just for more but different maps.

The most important innovator to step into this breach was actually not a cartographer at all, but an artist. Beginning in the late 1930s, Richard Edes Harrison drew a series of elegant and gripping images of a world at war, and in the process persuaded the public that aviation and war really had fundamentally disrupted the nature of geography.

The most powerful of these images anticipated the perspective of Google Earth.
Susan Schulten – New Republic

Craft and creativity

Richard Edes Harrison: Mapping the world at war

‘Harrison’s most notable legacy was a series of colorful and sometimes disorienting pictures (not quite maps) that emphasized relationships between cities, nations, and continents at the heart of the war. These maps were published in Fortune, then issued in an atlas that became an instant bestseller in 1944.’

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100 new emoji by Avery Monsen

100 new emoji - Avery Monsen

These seem to have been first released as a Vine. (via Boing Boing)

Life on the Internet

100 new emoji

Avery Monsen’s favourites are ‘A Box Which Must Never Be Opened’, ‘Three Worms Pretending To Be One Long Worm’ and ‘A Spectre Rises From A Seven Layer Fiesta Dip’, according to BuzzFeed.

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Twitter Emoji
Craft and creativity

Twitter’s emoji for the web

I’m really fond of these emoji characters Twitter had designed for the web (as apposed to mobile clients, which handle these icons themselves).

Twitter emoji

They’re not unlike the new flat emoticons WordPress put out recently, but I think I like these even more. Of course, they’re a more comprehensive set too.

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Ben Sack - Danse Macabre
Craft and creativity

Ben Sack’s mad maps

I don’t know much about these maps, except that they’re created by Ben Sack and they’re incredibly detailed. Check out this amazing timelapse:

More on his Tumblr blog

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A Visual Compendium of Typewriters

A throwback to the original word processor, this chart features over 60 beautiful hand-illustrations of some of the greatest typewriters from antiquity to recent history.

(via)

Craft and creativity

A Visual Compendium of Typewriters

Underscoring over 100 years of essential models from the first Hammond in 1870 to the Remington Rands and Smith Coronas of the 20th century, these marvellous contraptions are arrayed in ribbons of compositional innovation.

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Star Wars 80’s High School illustrations by Denis Medri. So perfect.
Light-based media

Star Wars High

Denis Medri reimagines Star Wars as an 80’s high school flick. This would be beyond wonderful. Seriously. Disney should get right on this!

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How to Draw Adventure Time

A sixteen-page manual detailing the intricacies of drawing Finn & Jake from Pendleton Ward’s Adventure Time series, hosted on Scribd by Fred ‘Frederator’ Seibert.

How to Draw Adventure Time

How to Draw Adventure Time

(via Boing Boing and Super Punch)

Light-based media

How to Draw Adventure Time

A sixteen-page manual detailing the intricacies of drawing Finn & Jake from Pendleton Ward’s “Adventure Time” series.

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Book of Bad Arguments - Cover

Bad Arguments

This book is aimed at newcomers to the field of logical reasoning, particularly those who, to borrow a phrase from Pascal, are so made that they understand best through visuals. I have selected a small set of common errors in reasoning and visualized them using memorable illustrations that are supplemented with lots of examples. The hope is that the reader will learn from these pages some of the most common pitfalls in arguments and be able to identify and avoid them in practice.

Humans and other animals

An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments

The literature on logic and logical fallacies is wide and exhaustive. This work’s novelty is in its use of illustrations to describe a small set of common errors in reasoning that plague a lot of our present discourse.

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Scarfolk is a town in North West England that did not progress beyond 1979. Instead, the entire decade of the 1970s loops ad infinitum.
scarfolk.blogspot.co.uk

(via Laughing Squid)

Craft and creativity

Scarfolk Council

Here in Scarfolk, pagan rituals blend seamlessly with science; hauntology is a compulsory subject at school, and everyone must be in bed by 8pm because they are perpetually running a slight fever. “Visit Scarfolk today. Our number one priority is keeping rabies at bay.” For more information please reread.

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Chip Kidd: Designing books is no laughing matter. OK, it is

Michael Crichton fax Chip Kidd doesn’t judge books by their cover, he creates covers that embody the book — and he does it with a wicked sense of humor. In one of the funniest talks from TED2012, he shows the art and deep thought of his cover designs.

Not what I was expecting from a TED talk!

Alex Jay examines the evolution of the Star Wars logo.

Credit for the Star Wars logo belongs to Suzy Rice. First there was her original design. Second, Joe Johnston revised her logo for the film. And third, there was her original logo with the revised “W”, which can be traced to Jim Novak, whose contribution, although minor, was significant.
Anatomy of a Logo: Star Wars

Light-based media

The evolution of the Star Wars logo

Alex Jay examines the evolution of the Star Wars logo.

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Banksy on advertising

Craft and creativity

Banksy on advertising

People are taking the piss out of you everyday. They butt into your life, take a cheap shot at you and then disappear. They leer at you from tall buildings and make you feel small. They make flippant comments from buses that imply you’re not sexy enough and that all the fun is happening somewhere else. They are on TV making your girlfriend feel inadequate. They have access to the most sophisticated technology the world has ever seen and they bully you with it. They are The Advertisers and they are laughing at you.

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Good Show Sir showcases only the worst Sci-fi/Fantasy book covers.

There are many pieces of cover art that are beautiful to behold. Yet, there are others which exhibit a rarer, odd form of beauty. We think that such conflicts of focal points, lettering choices, false perspectives, anatomical befuddlement, ridiculous transport vehicles, oversized and frankly unusable monster-hunting weaponry, clothing choices that would get you killed walking down the street let alone hiking a through a frozen wasteland, clichéd cat-people, and downright bad art deserve their own special form of tribute.

Is it wrong that I love so many of these?

Craft and creativity

Good Show Sir

Only the worst Sci-fi/Fantasy book covers

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Bioshock Infinite art screenshot

Art dealers Cook & Decker have teamed up with Irrational Games to sell some very large and very expensive prints, each displaying art from BioShock Infinite.
Interestingly, the art isn’t taken from the game’s wonderful concept works. They’re screenshots, though the word does them a slight disservice. These are prints based on the super hi-res and rendered environments normally used for magazine screenshots, meaning you’re getting something that’ll actually stand up to closer inspection.
Art Dealer Is Selling The World’s Most Expensive Screenshots

Craft and creativity

Screenshots as art

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