Pepo watermelon slicer

The Pepo watermelon slicer is fun for kids and adults.

Product designer Avihai Ahurin has developed these clever ‘Pepo’ lolly-shaped cutters as a fun way to eat his watermelon, while avoiding waste.

(via fubiz.net)

Craft and creativity

Ice lolly shaped cutter for watermelons

Product designer Avihai Ahurin has developed these clever ‘Pepo’ lolly-shaped cutters as a fun way to eat his watermelon, while avoiding waste.

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Bacon Method
Craft and creativity

Bacon Method

Dan Benjamin has a simple method for cooking perfect bacon.
A bacon method:

  1. Line a pan with the bacon. You can use a glass baking pan, a steel or aluminum baking sheet, or even a cast iron pan.
  2. Put the pan into a cold, unheated oven.
  3. Set the oven to bake at 400°F (204°C).
  4. Set the timer for 20 minutes. It may take a bit more or less time, depending on your oven.
  5. Remove the pan from the oven. Place the bacon on a plate.
  6. Enjoy the best, crispiest, most delicious bacon you’ve ever had.

See also: Other posts on this blog tagged food.

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Nietzsche
Miscellany

Nietzsche’s Angel Food Cake

By Rebecca Coffey:

  1. Allow the angel to reach room temperature. Then kill it.
  2. Kill God. Set Him aside.
  3. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  4. Ecstatically whip, as if possessed by a storm-wind of freedom, 1-1/2 cups of excellent egg whites with 1/4 tsp. salt and 1-1/2 tsp. cream of tartar. Continue until peaks are as if raised to their own heights and given wings in a fine air, a robust air.
  5. Gradually add 3/4 cup sugar, about 3 tbsp. at a time.
  6. You are brilliant.
  7. Now, add 1 tsp. vanilla and 1/4 tsp. almond extract, and then sift together 1-1/4 cups flour and 3/4 cup sugar.
  8. Blend in God and the angel. Emboldened, add the egg mixture.
  9. Gaze into the überbatter. The überbatter will gaze into you.
  10. While prancing about in a frenzy of self-satisfaction and anticipation, use a rubber scraper to push the überbatter into an ungreased 10” tube pan, for it is destined to be there.
  11. Bake on a lower rack until done, usually 35-40 minutes, while reciting to the upper rack a long, convoluted anecdote about your childhood.
  12. Invert the tube pan over a bottle for a few hours. Then impetuously rap the pan. Shout, “Aha!” and slide a knife along the pan’s insides.
  13. Call what tumbles out a cake if you dare. Call it miraculous even.
  14. Eat it. It is delicate, morbid, loveable, and you will die depressed, delirious, and overweight.

From Nietzsche’s Angel Food Cake: And Other “Recipes” for the Intellectually Famished, by Rebecca Coffey

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A Girl Called Jack
Life on the Internet

A Girl Called Jack: cooking on the breadline

A video feature from The Guardian:

Jack Monroe, who writes the blog A Girl Called Jack, discusses how she became a popular austerity cook and food blogger while living below the poverty line, and demonstrates how to cook one of her signature dishes: the carrot, cumin and kidney bean burger. A selection of recipes from A Girl Called Jack are to be published next year in a book of the same name.

There’s also an article from earlier this year: Jack Monroe: the face of modern poverty.

Cooking can be done cheaply, she says, but it is more complicated than that. She had been passionate about cooking ever since her food technology course at school (“a form of escapism from all the words and numbers”). Not only did she have the skills to experiment with her own dishes, she says, but, more importantly, she had the confidence.

“Food poverty comes in two strands. The first is not having enough money to buy food for yourself and your family. The second is poverty of education.”

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Dripper
Miscellany

Make amazing coffee at home, even if you’re cheap and lazy

Slate’s crash course in being a B+ coffee snob.

Here’s the truth: You don’t have to be a champion barista (or aspire to be one) in order to dramatically, and quickly, improve your at-home coffee process, nor do you need to spend $500 on equipment. And the per-cup price is better, too—such that, just a few weeks into your new at-home process, you’ll have recouped the costs of your initial investments.

The only moderately expensive piece of unfamiliar equipment you will need to acquire is a conical burr grinder, which grinds beans finely and evenly (as opposed to a disc grinder, which tends to chop them in half once and call it done). Apart from that, you’ll need to acquire a dripper, a server (a glass carafe with measurement lines on it), and, if you don’t have one already, a digital kitchen scale (preferably one you can “zero-out” after placing a small cup on it, which is what you’ll put the beans in as you measure).

You really do need this stuff, because you won’t get the full benefits of a coffee’s flavor unless you’re exact about the weight of your beans and the volume of your water.
Be a B+ Coffee Snob

I always make my coffee with a dripper when I’m on holiday. It’s a total lifesaver.

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The Charted Cheese Wheel

The Charted Cheese Wheel

I can’t vouch for its accuracy. The cheddar looks a little orange to me.

Miscellany

Cheese wheel infographic

A Chart of 66 delightful cheeses from around the world, assembled into one wondrous wheel. The cheeses are broken down by the animal that produced the luscious milk, and then by the texture of the resultant cheese, forming a cornucopia of cheese that range from the mild to the stinky and from the rock hard to the silky smooth.

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