Why this elbow is a Time Person of the Year

Vox: That elbow in the lower right-hand corner is attached to a young hospital worker from Texas, who anonymously reported her harassment for fear of the negative impact it could have on her and her family. It represents a much larger contingent than the women on the cover: the silence keepers.

Time's person of the year 2017

The Story Behind the Woman You Don’t See…

Time: The worker, who made a sexual harassment complaint anonymously, told TIME she remembers vivid details about what happened to her, and she couldn’t stop wondering whether she could have prevented the encounter. She said: “I thought, What just happened? Why didn’t I react? I kept thinking, Did I do something, did I say something, did I look a certain way to make him think that was O.K.?”

See also: Other posts tagged ‘equality’.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights by Zen Pencils, a website where inspirational quotes from famous people are adapted into cartoons by Gavin Aung Than.

another beautiful story: In our latest episode, we speak to Melbourne based cartoonist Gavin Aung Than of Zen Pencils. “A lot of people think I’m just living an exciting life, thinking of ideas and drawing, but being a cartoonist is a lot of hard work”. And while it may be hard work for Gavin to continually push out good quality comics, the cartoonist reveals in this video why his readers feedback, has in-turn made him find his calling.

Progression and regression

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

“I quit my job without any grand plan, it was a big risk and one of the scariest things I have ever done.” – Gavin Aung Than

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WEB Du Bois

WEB Du Bois: retracing his attempt to challenge racism with data

The Guardian: The civil rights pioneer and scholar is most famous for his book The Souls of Black Folk, but his use of data to show inequality is still profound today

Mona Chalabi has updated WEB Du Bois’ visualizations with recent data, while staying faithful to the design of the original illustrations.

I thought about DuBois while drawing these. Not just his outstanding craft (how did he manage to get those lines so straight? Those labels so neat?) but how he would feel to look at data 117 years later about the “present condition” of black Americans.

See also

Progression and regression

WEB Du Bois: Using data to show inequality, updated

The civil rights pioneer and scholar is most famous for his book The Souls of Black Folk, but his use of data to show inequality is still profound today.

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BBC Stories: This invention helped me write again

When Emma Lawton was 29 she was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.
As a graphic designer, drawing is a huge part of her life but over the past three years the tremor in her hands has grown more pronounced stopping her from writing and drawing straight lines.
Enter Haiyan Zhang and her invention that is changing Emma’s life.

See also

How to measure typographic accessibility

Fontsmith: The illustrations use one of our most accessible typefaces FS Me which was researched and developed with charity Mencap and designed specifically to improve legibility for people with learning disabilities.

See also

Use your words

How to measure typographic accessibility

“Accessibility in typography is not an exact science and there is no such thing as either accessible or not. It is better to imagine a sliding scale where certain speciality typefaces are highly accessible at one end and some eg. script or display fonts are very inaccessible at the other end. Most fonts lie somewhere in the middle.” — Fontsmith

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The Refugee Nation flag
Shape of things to come

The Refugee Nation

The Refugee Nation Olympic flag was inspired by a lifejacket: The official flag for The Refugee Nation, a team of ten refugees currently competing in the Rio Olympics, draws its colour scheme and design from lifejackets. Designed by Syrian artist and refugee Yara Said, the flag is a vivid orange with a single black stripe.

“A black and orange (colors of the life vests) is a symbol of solidarity for all those who crossed the sea in search of a new country. I myself wore one, which is why I so identify with these colors—and these people.”
Yara Said

See also The Flag of Planet Earth and other posts tagged ‘vexillology’

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Canon’s The Lab: Decoy – A portrait session with a twist

A photograph is shaped more by the person behind the camera than by what’s in front of it. To prove this we invited six photographers to a portrait session with a twist. ‘Decoy’ is one of six experiments from The Lab, designed to shift creative thinking behind the lens.

A portrait session with a twist

Each photographer was told a different story about the life of their subject. Can you tell which image is of the millionaire, the recovering alcoholic, the lifesaver, the ex-con, the fisherman or the psychic?

THE LAB: DECOY - A portrait session with a twist

(via kottke)

See also

Blacks and Whites board game

A ’70s Board Game Designed to Teach Players About Race, Housing, and Privilege

This 1970 board game, Blacks & Whites: The Role Identity & Neighborhood Action Game, created by the magazine Psychology Today used gameplay to teach adult players about racial privilege and housing.

Slate: The game, a sideways adaptation of Monopoly, allows players to choose white or black identities.”Black” players start the game with $10,000; “white” players with $1,000,000. Rules for each of the game’s four housing zones—in “Estate Zone,” players playing as black could buy “only when they have one million dollars in assets”—are calibrated to make it hard for the “black” players to climb out of their initial cash deficits. “The goal of the game is to achieve economic equality,” writes Swann Auction Galleries’ Wyatt H. Day, “yet the game is strategically designed to make a black win impossible.”

(via)

See also

Humans and other animals

Blacks & Whites: A ’70s board game about race, housing, and privilege

This satirical Monopoly-esque board game was made to underscore the socioeconomic disparities between Blacks & Whites. It was “designed for educational use… to give middle-class whites a taste of the helplessness that comes from living against implacable odds.” The game begins when 3 to 9 players select whether to play as white or black. White players are then instructed to begin with $1,000,000; black players begin with just $10,000. The goal of the highly controversial game is to achieve economic equality, yet the game is strategically designed to make a black win impossible. — Swann Auction Galleries

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Percentage of Slaves by U.S. County, 1860

I find the numbers incredible. South Carolina and Mississippi had more slaves than free citizens!

Census of 1860

In September of 1861, the U.S. Coast Survey published a large map, approximately two feet by three feet, titled a “Map showing the distribution of the slave population of the southern states of the United States.” Based on the population statistics gathered in the 1860 Census, and certified by the superintendent of the Census Office, the map depicted the percentage of the population enslaved in each county. At a glance, the viewer could see the large-scale patterns of the economic system that kept nearly 4 million people in bondage: slavery was concentrated along the Chesapeake Bay and in eastern Virginia; along the South Carolina and Georgia coasts; in a crescent of lands in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi; and most of all, in the Mississippi River Valley. With each county labeled with the exact percentage of people enslaved, the map demanded some closer examination.

Smithsonian: These Maps Reveal How Slavery Expanded Across the United States

(via reddit)

Humans and other animals

Distribution of the slave population of the southern United States, 1860

In 1861, in an attempt to raise money for sick and wounded soldiers, the Census Office produced and sold a map that showed the population distribution of slaves in the southern United States. Based on data from the 1860 census, this map was the Census Office’s first attempt to map population density. — census.gov

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Angry Jack
Life on the Internet

Why Are You So Angry?

Ian Danskin (aka Innuendo Studios) has just posted the final part in his six-part series on the male gamer’s relationship to feminism.

Part 1: A Short History of Anita Sarkeesian

The internet is full of Angry Jacks, and Jack is not exclusively, but is typically, male. He’s also commonly white, and/or straight, and/or cis, and/or raised middle class. Which is to say, he usually looks like me.

To people who look like me, Jack is often a nuisance. To people who don’t look like me, Jack is frequently dangerous.

Part 2: Angry Jack

[…] And you’re thinking, or maybe even starting to say, “I shouldn’t have to have this debate right now. I just wanted to go to a fucking party. I’m normal! This is a normal thing to do!” And all she said was “no thanks, I don’t drink,” but that doesn’t matter, what you heard was “you’re a bad person.”

Watch parts 3, 4, 5 & 6 →

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“Slavery to Mass Incarceration”

The myth of racial difference that was created to sustain American slavery persists today. Slavery did not end in 1865, it evolved.

Narrated by Bryan Stevenson. Art by Molly Crabapple.

See also:

Kate Parker first started photographing her girls several years ago, with the hope of teaching them that “Whatever you are…that’s okay.”

See also

Light-based media

Strong is the new pretty

“There’s a lot of pressure for girls (and women) to look a certain way, act in a certain manner, and I wanted to let my daughters know that who they naturally are is enough.” — Kate Parker

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Continue reading on The Nib

(via Matt Bors)

Humans and other animals

Lighten Up – the subtle racism of shifting skin tones in comics

“I’m always sensitive about bringing up this sort of thing in work environments. The mere mention of race puts white people on edge, and that puts everybody else on edge.” –Ronald Wimberly

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Britain has a long history of invasions: over the past two millennia, various armies from the Romans to the Anglo-Saxons conquered the bulk of the British Isles. A new genetic analysis of the country has revealed which invading force had the greatest impact on its DNA.
The Verge: Genetic map of the UK shows which invasions created Britain’s DNA

Nature: The results throw new light on several aspects of the peopling of Britain. For instance the genetic contribution to southeastern England from Anglo-Saxon migrations is under half, suggesting significant pre-Roman but post-Mesolithic population movement from the European continent. The data also reveal that non-Saxon regions contain genetically differentiated subgroups rather than a general ‘Celtic’ population.

Humans and other animals

Genetic map of the UK shows which invasions created Britain’s DNA

“Peter Donnelly and colleagues use such data from a selected geographically diverse sample of more than 2,000 individuals from the United Kingdom to reveal remarkable concordance between genetic clusters and geography.” — Nature

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Though race is one of those seismic issues—the stuff of movements and monuments and multiday conferences at top universities—the moments revealed in the six-word submissions are smaller in nature and much more intimate:

Brown-skinned mothers who are mistaken as the nannies of their lighter skinned children.

Blue-eyed teenagers who grow outsize afros to win easy (or at least easier) acceptance on the basketball court.

Asians with Irish last names who delight at seeing the faces of potential employers when they show up for job interviews.

And blonde women who understand why their children choose to identify as “Black-tino” out of cultural convenience but quietly die inside because they feel rejected or left out. This is all part of the crazy quilt of America. Our diversity is the marvel of the world and represents one of our greatest strengths as a nation. It heralds progress but not without pain for those who live on the knife-edge of multiple cultures.

(via @picpedant)

Humans and other animals, Shape of things to come

Visualising race, identity and change

“Official statistics can paint a useful picture. Appearance is an important aspect of the story. But to understand race—and more specifically racial ambiguity—it helps to understand those whose lives are defined by it.” — National Geographic

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Crowd control infographic

Check out the graph along the bottom showing the number of significant protests worldwide over time. I’d like to investigate that a bit more, the only source they provide for this whole infographic is ‘SCMP research’.

This is interesting too:

Cause or effect?

Are the police only arresting, pepper spraying and teargassing protestors when violence erupts, or is it possible that these actions are triggering violence? A bit of both perhaps.

Shape of things to come

Crowd control inforgaphic

“From time to time, governments across the world need to control crowds, demonstrations and riots. Here we take a close look at the means available for law enforcement and the lates developments of the protests in Hong Kong.”

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Vincent Debanne, Battleship

Battleship is a photo series by artist Vincent Debanne:

“I show this gathering of yachts as a naval battle, because that’s what it is, a balance of power, a fight. Photomontage gives me the opportunity to reveal, to exaggerate this underlying violence, the violence of economic war.”

“My photo series always play with realism: the documentary side of my images is essential. It has to be plausible at first sight. That’s because my work is not fanciful but seeks to interrogate reality, often in a sociological and political perspective. It engages in a dialectical relationship with reality.”

(via Creative Applications)

Shape of things to come

Battleships for the super rich

Vincent Debanne uses image manipulation to turn luxury yachts into formidable warships and the bays of Antibes and of St-Tropez into theaters of war, while also providing a commentary on some of our world’s current economic, social and political issues.

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Women as Background Decoration: Part 2 – Tropes vs Women in Video Games

This is the second episode exploring the Women as Background Decoration trope in video games. In this installment we expand our discussion to examine how sexualized female bodies often occupy a dual role as both sexual playthings and the perpetual victims of male violence.

A trip down the anti-feminist rabbit hole →

J. Michael Straczynski
Shape of things to come

Rules of the New Aristocracy

By Babylon 5 creator J. Michael Straczynski:

It doesn’t matter how much food costs increase, doesn’t matter if you can only afford fast food, we will always be able to buy steak. And we will invest heavily in fast food stocks to ensure we make money off this. Doesn’t matter how much gas costs, we will always be able to afford it.

Burger

In addition to poor food choices and health coverage, your kids will grow up without proper nutrition which will cause them problems on every level, from physical to educational difficulties. Our kids will grow up straight and true and healthy.

It doesn’t matter how much an education costs, doesn’t matter if your kids can’t afford to go to college or come out with massive debt, we will always be able to send our kids to university. And because a lot of our income is derived from tax incentives and taxpayer-financed bailouts your taxes are sending our kids to school. But you do not have the right to any of our money to send your kid to school.

If you or your kids want to start a business, you will find that because we’ve sucked all the money out of the economy, there is simply no available cash around to help you finance your startup. (Unless you want to go to your friends online at sites like Indiegogo, and isn’t that just cute?) We just cut our kids a check and tell them to go have fun.

Your kids are born with a glass ceiling above which they will almost certainly never have the opportunity to rise. Our kids are born with a marble floor beneath which they will never be allowed to fall.

Continued →

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Change The Way You Look At Women

Images from Getty’s new Lean In collection, a library of images devoted to the powerful depiction of women, girls and the people who support them. Jointly curated by Getty Images and LeanIn.Org – the women’s empowerment nonprofit founded by Sheryl Sandberg – the collection features over 2,500 images of female leadership in contemporary work and life.

44 Stock Photos That Hope To Change The Way We Look At Women – BuzzFeed

The Accessible Icon
Craft and creativity

The Accessible Icon Project

The Accessible Icon Project want to give the International Symbol of Access a more 21st Century, even paralympic, feel.

(1) Head is forward to indicate the forward motion of the person through space. Here the person is the “driver” or decision maker about her mobility. (2) Depicting the body in motion represents the symbolically active status of navigating the world. (3) By including white angled knockouts the symbol presents the wheel as being in motion. (4) The human depiction in this icon is consistent with other body representations found in the ISO 7001 – DOT Pictograms. (5) The leg has been moved forward to allow for more space between it and the wheel which allows for better readability and cleaner application of icon as a stencil.

The old icon displays that passivity: its arms and legs are drawn like mechanical parts, its posture is unnaturally erect, and its entire look is one that make the chair, not the person, important and visible.

Accessible icon comparison

Is it time for a new wheelchair access icon?

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Poverty is not only the lack of income and wealth but also the poverty of power. A key part of the poverty of power is to be defined as dependent: dependent on charity, handouts, welfare.

Yet, it is the wealthy, not the poor, who are dependent on government subsidies. To transform dependency into self-determination is the work of poor people’s movements. To demonstrate the dependency of the wealthy on welfare as well as on the labor of the poor must be our collective work.
“Who is Dependent on Welfare” with Ananya Roy

A Girl Called Jack
Life on the Internet

A Girl Called Jack: cooking on the breadline

A video feature from The Guardian:

Jack Monroe, who writes the blog A Girl Called Jack, discusses how she became a popular austerity cook and food blogger while living below the poverty line, and demonstrates how to cook one of her signature dishes: the carrot, cumin and kidney bean burger. A selection of recipes from A Girl Called Jack are to be published next year in a book of the same name.

There’s also an article from earlier this year: Jack Monroe: the face of modern poverty.

Cooking can be done cheaply, she says, but it is more complicated than that. She had been passionate about cooking ever since her food technology course at school (“a form of escapism from all the words and numbers”). Not only did she have the skills to experiment with her own dishes, she says, but, more importantly, she had the confidence.

“Food poverty comes in two strands. The first is not having enough money to buy food for yourself and your family. The second is poverty of education.”

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Shape of things to come

If you’re unemployed, it’s not because there isn’t any work

Be sure to read beyond the headline…

If you're unemployed it's not because there isn't any work

If you’re unemployed it’s not because there isn’t any work

Just look around: A housing shortage, crime, pollution; we need better schools and parks. Whatever our needs, they all require work. And as long as we have unsatisfied needs, there’s work to be done.

So ask yourself, what kind of world has work but no jobs. It’s a world where work is not related to satisfying our needs, a world where work is only related to satisfying the profit needs of business.

This country was not built by the huge corporations or government bureaucracies. It was built by people who work. And, it is working people who should control the work to be done. Yet, as long as employment is tied to somebody else’s profits, the work won’t get done.

The New American Movement (NAM) was an American New Left socialist and feminist political organization established in 1971.

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Princess Merida
Light-based media

Pixar’s Merida ‘sexualised’ for induction into The Disney Princess Collection

Princess Merida - Sassy or sexy?

Princess Merida – Sassy or sexy?

Merida’s creator Brenda Chapman — who won an Oscar for writing and co-directing Brave — fiercely criticised Disney’s sexy makeover of her feisty heroine as “a blatantly sexist marketing move based on money.” Merida now appears slimmer, older and somewhat sexualised with seemingly higher cheekbones, heavier makeup, better groomed hair, a considerably thinner waistline and exposed shoulders.

“I think it’s atrocious what they have done to Merida. When little girls say they like it because it’s more sparkly, that’s all fine and good but, subconsciously, they are soaking in the sexy ‘come hither’ look and the skinny aspect of the new version. It’s horrible! Merida was created to break that mold — to give young girls a better, stronger role model, a more attainable role model, something of substance, not just a pretty face that waits around for romance.”

Related

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Saga 1 cover by Fiona Staples
Shape of things to come

Apple bans Saga issue from iOS

Update: A statement from David Steinberger, the CEO of
comiXology, has revealed that in fact Apple did not ban the comic. “As a partner of Apple, we have an obligation to respect its policies for apps and the books offered in apps. Based on our understanding of those policies, we believed that Saga #12 could not be made available in our app, and so we did not release it today.” Though I’m still curious to know exactly what happened. I’ve also read elsewhere that Saga has included a hetero-blowjob before (I’m behind in my reading – I like the graphic novels) which contrary to my view below does seem to make this a hypocritical decision – whoever made it.


There’s a lot I like about Apple products, but I utterly resent that they keep pulling this censorship crap.

As has hopefully been clear from the first page of our first issue, SAGA is a series for the proverbial “mature reader.” Unfortunately, because of two postage stamp-sized images of gay sex, Apple is banning tomorrow’s SAGA #12 from being sold through any iOS apps. This is a drag, especially because our book has featured what I would consider much more graphic imagery in the past, but there you go. Fiona and I could always edit the images in question, but everything we put into the book is there to advance our story, not (just) to shock or titillate, so we’re not changing shit.
Brian K. Vaughan’s statement on Apple’s Banning of Saga

People have been quick to cry ‘homophobia’, but I’m not convinced that is the case here. The image is explicit even by Saga’s standards, and it wouldn’t be any less so if a woman featured. Say what you will about Apple, but they’ve been pretty vocal supporters of equality.

See one of these ‘postage stamp-sized’ images →

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Social classes
Humans and other animals

Does social class matter?

What race is to the United States, Class or social standing is to the United Kingdom. It’s not meant to be important and indeed you can live most of your life and not be aware of it, if you choose not to be. Whilst nowhere near as important as it used to be, class differences still exist and therefore to some degree they matter.
Stephen Liddell

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