Jill Pelto - Climate change art

Bangor Daily News: Jill Pelto, an artist and scientist, recently completed a project as part of her honors thesis that explores the issues of human-induced climate change she has studied with her father over many years of study.

“I call it environmental art,” she said. “The way I use it is specifically to communicate particular issues.”

Jill Pelto made it her mission to show others the facts through unique watercolors and screen prints that illustrate the effects of climate change by integrating scientific data with her own unique artwork.

“I incorporated a graph with data points and used some sort of illustration to give a narrative about what the piece was about,” Jill Pelto said. “A lot of scientists don’t know how to communicate their research. … Since I’m involved in both the science world and the art world, I think I have a unique ability to bridge those.”

Climate Central: Her father, Mauri Pelto, is a glacier researcher who has worked in Washington’s North Cascades for decades. Glaciers there have been receding at an alarming rate, including a huge drop in 2015 following the hottest year on record for the region. The warm year also caused a large portion of precipitation to fall as rain rather than snow, further shrinking glaciers across the region.

Summer trips to the region have been a family affair since Jill was in high school and they’re what piqued her interest in making climate impacts clear.

(via Kottke)

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Jill Pelto: Climate change art

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“In a way, the depth of conservative animosity for a bike-share program makes perfect sense. Because, as the Venn diagram above indicates, Citi Bike finds itself at the very nexus of five different things that conservatives hate.”
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  • CSD1: A climate science denier of the first kind simply denies basic climate science, that, say the Earth is warming or that CO2 is a greenhouse gas.
  • CSD2: Climate science deniers of the second kind say that they accept basic climate science — so they aren’t ignored by the media — but then just assert that it isn’t going to be a big deal. They usually latch on to some tiny subset of the recent literature to make this argument.
  • CSD3: A CSD3 says that they accept basic climate science but then starts making arguments that effectively deny that science. Indeed a CSD3 who is rhetorically clever often says he or she used to believe in climate science, but then supposedly looked into the matter closely and were shocked, shocked to learn that they had been misled.

I don’t know that Romm created these distinctions himself, but this is the first place I’ve seen them laid out.

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