time for sushi

Directed by David Lewandowski. Previously: going to the store and late for meeting.

Stick around until the end of this video for some ads for the incredible goods on offer in the official store of Lewandowski’s channel: goingtothe.store.

The future of independent, artisanal, high-effort nonsense on YouTube is uncertain. I appreciate your choice to support this work with the purchase of my unusual merch.

Deluxe Dakimakura Body Pillow

Enjoy the intersection of luxury and comfort in this Japanese-style body pillow. The 160 x 50cm pillowcase is made from durable, silky 2-way tricot material.

The incredible $90,000 Premium Edition Chess Set

Premium Edition Chess Set
Remember that time you watched that YouTube video? Why not commemorate the experience with a premium chess set carved in ethically sourced arctic mammoth ivory and rare meteorite alloy. Handcrafted by artisans specializing in these elements for a combined 38 years, this product reflects a dedication to premium YouTube memorabilia.

There are other more modest items too, like towels and pillow cases.

See also

Portraits of Imaginary People

A work in progress by Mike Tyka:

For a while now I’ve been experimenting with ways to use generative neural nets to make portraits.

Adding a third stage allows upressing up to 4k. However I dont have any actual training data at that resolution, meaning the network only learns to generally predict smooth edges etc, It can’t know the details of what skin pores or eyelashes look like. A super-highres database of faces would be needed here. Still for purposes of printing it’s nicer to create some interesting looking artifacts at this resolution, rather than bilinear interpolation of just pixelation.

Anyways, the goal is to make these into printable physical-world art pieces but I found in practice the resolution and detail has to be pretty high or it just doesn’t look nice printed. Like I said, it’s all work in flux and progress, more soon.

(via waxy)

See also

Craft and creativity

Portraits of imaginary people

Mike Tyka studied biochemistry and biotechnology at the University of Bristol and currently works at Google. He became involved in creating sculpture and art in 2009 and later co-founded ALTSpace, a shared art studio in Seattle where he started creating sculptures of protein folds.

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BLOOMS: Strobe Animated Sculptures Invented by John Edmark

John Edmark: Blooms are 3-D printed sculptures designed to animate when spun under a strobe light. Unlike a 3D zoetrope, which animates a sequence of small changes to objects, a bloom animates as a single self-contained sculpture. The bloom’s animation effect is achieved by progressive rotations of the golden ratio, phi (ϕ), the same ratio that nature employs to generate the spiral patterns we see in pinecones and sunflowers. The rotational speed and strobe rate of the bloom are synchronized so that one flash occurs every time the bloom turns 137.5º (the angular version of phi).* Each bloom’s particular form and behavior is determined by a unique parametric seed I call a phi-nome (/fī nōm/).

(via @5tu)

See also

  • Instructables: How to make these phi-based strobe animated sculptures, by John Edmark — “This instructable demonstrates and explains blooms, a unique type of sculpture I invented that animates when spun while lit by a strobe light (or captured by a video camera with a very fast shutter speed). Unlike a traditional 3D zoetrope, which is essentially a flip book of multiple objects, a bloom is a single coherent sculpture whose ability to be animated is intrinsic to its geometry.”
  • SLO: 3D Printed Camera — Amos Dudley made made his own 3D printed camera, with lens. He has even made the design files available for download so you can print your own.
  • Still File: Real recreations of computer renderings — …a series of 4 photographs recreating computer renderings as physical scenes.

Block Bills

Block Bills – 64 banknotes generated from the Bitcoin Blockchain

Creative Applications Network: Created by Matthias Dörfelt, ‘Block Bills’ is a series of 64 banknotes generated from the Bitcoin Blockchain. Each banknote represents one block in the chain and the whole series consist of 64 consecutive blocks starting at block #456476.

Block Bills

See also

Shape of things to come

Block Bills – 64 banknotes generated from the Bitcoin Blockchain

Matthias Dörfelt (1987, Hamburg, Germany) is a Los Angeles-based artist. He mainly works in software producing artifacts ranging from drawings, prints, animation, videos and interactive installations to robotics. In his works he often trades control in favor of surprise because he strongly believes in computation as an expressive, playful and humorous tool.

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r/place

sudoscript: Last weekend, a fascinating act in the history of humanity played out on Reddit.

r/place timelapse

For April Fool’s Day, Reddit launched a little experiment. It gave its users, who are all anonymous, a blank canvas called Place.

The rules were simple. Each user could choose one pixel from 16 colors to place anywhere on the canvas. They could place as many pixels of as many colors as they wanted, but they had to wait a few minutes between placing each one.

Over the following 72 hours, what emerged was nothing short of miraculous. A collaborative artwork that shocked even its inventors.

Above, some of my favourite little areas // Below, a static look at the ‘finished’ piece

The final form of r/place

Read more

  • Sudoscript: When Pixels CollideBut at its core, the story of Place is an eternal story, about the three forces that humanity needs to make art, creation, and technology possible.
  • Waxy: This Must Be The /r/PlaceEvery tiny patch of the Place is a story. Every piece of real estate represents a hard-fought battle, drawn from the collective activity of hundreds of smaller communities teaming together, and often against each other.
  • The r/place Atlas

And here’s a video timelapse that shows areas in detail →

Life on the Internet

r/place: a social experiment on a large canvas

“On April Fool’s Day, when the rest of the internet devolves into a cesspool of unfunny press releases and fake product launches, Reddit becomes the most interesting place online by unleashing a social experiment on its enormous community.” — Andy Baio / Waxy

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Mateusz Urbanowicz "Tokyo Storefront" series

Mateusz Urbanowicz: “Tokyo Storefront” series

When I moved to Tokyo, more than 3 years ago I was really surprised that upon my walks I encountered so many shops still in business in really old buildings. Differently to Kobe, where the earthquake wiped out a lot of these old downtown houses and shops, in Tokyo they still survive.

Mateusz Urbanowicz "Tokyo Storefront" series

Spoon & Tamago: Mateusz Urbanowicz, also known as Matto, is a Polish artist and illustrator currently based in Tokyo. One of his latest projects is the Tokyo Storefront series.

See also

Craft and creativity

Matto’s incredible watercolour paintings of Tokyo storefronts

Born and raised in Silesia, Poland, Mateusz Urbanowicz studied electronic engineering until he found out that making art can be more than a weird hobby…

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‘Rooms’ by Jordan Bolton

These creative movie posters are made by recreating a film’s set design in miniature.

Prints are available on Etsy and Amazon. (via ARCHatlas)

See also: The man who made some of cinema’s most iconic movie titles & these wonderful animated movie posters by Pablo Fernández Eyre.

Craft and creativity

Jordan Bolton’s miniature film set posters

These creative movie posters are made by recreating a film’s set design in miniature.

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Still File

…is a series of 4 photographs recreating computer renderings as physical scenes by Skrekkøgle, a product and digital design studio in Oslo.

Cube, sphere and cone geometry with material textures mahogany, clear glass and white marble. Placed on reflective checkers plane.

Floating colored cube without environment. Low greyscale resolution creates gradient banding in background.

Three white Utah teapots – scaled, rotated, intersected and distorted. Diffuse lighting, composed on matte yellow plane.

Patterned spheres with pink metallic texture. Panoramic photo of a beach added on cylindrical environment, mirrored in both the base plane and in the metal spheres.

See also: Other posts tagged ‘3D’ and ‘CGI’.

Light-based media

Still File: Real recreations of computer renderings

The photos’ artifacts, surroundings, camera settings and lighting has been shaped intending to resemble 3d graphics of different types.

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Beautiful Wooden Lego

Fubiz: French designer Baptiste Tavitian (aka BTmanufacture) made these gorgeous wooden sculptures of Lego ‘minifigs’ and bricks.

Made entirely by hand, the little figurines resemble the famous minifigs, and exist in several sizes; The largest measuring 80cm, and are manufactured in very limited edition.

See also: Lego sets are getting grayer

Craft and creativity

Beautiful wooden sculptures of Lego

“Bringing life to peculiar puppets with my own hands, I work in a small workshop with the concern of underscoring the material. A special attention to details and a touch of eccentricity are my ingredients; for I like my artisanal creations to be unique and singular.” — Baptiste Tavitian

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The planet Jupiter. Observed November 1, 1880

The Public Domain Review: The French artist, astronomer and amateur entomologist Étienne Léopold Trouvelot is noted for the 7000 or so illustrations he created from his astronomical observations, the quality of which reached their zenith in the 15 exquisite pastel works which were published as ‘The Trouvelot Astronomical Drawings’ in 1882.

As well as his illustrations, Trouvelot also published some 50 scientific papers, and was credited with discovering “veiled spots” on the Sun in 1875.

See also

See also: Other posts on this blog tagged ‘space’.

Craft and creativity

The pastel astronomical drawings of Étienne Léopold Trouvelot (1882)

The second and rather more unfortunate legacy Trouvelot left the world was the accidental widespread introduction of the highly destructive European Gyspy moth onto North American soil. Although he reportedly notified some nearby entomologists and relevant officials no action was taken. A few decades later the species was rife. — The Public Domain Review

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The Daily Spoon

The Daily Spoon

The past year [2014] Stian spent most of his time exploring the unique organic qualities of wood and how adding of a function can beautifully refine a piece of wood. The project consists of 365 unique hand carved spoons made from various types of wood. One carved everyday through a year.

(via Kottke)

See also

  • Velocipedia: Bikes drawn hastily from memory, realised by a product designer — These weird and wonderful bike designs were produced by product designer Gianluca Gimini, based on designs he had solicited from friends and strangers over several years.
  • The Toyota Setsuna (Japanese for “moment”) is a roadster concept car made from cedar and birch and built using a traditional Japanese carpentry technique known as “okuriari” that doesn’t involve nails or screws but relies on perfectly carved joints to hold the components together.
  • Primitive Technology: Making a bow and arrow“I made a bow and arrows in the wild using only natural materials and primitive tools I’d made previously from scratch (as usual). The tools used were a celt stone hatchet, a stone chisel, various stone blades and fire sticks.”
Craft and creativity

The Daily Spoon

“By repeating the production of a spoon every day for a longer period of time (365 days), the goal is to challenge and explore a spoons aesthetic and functional qualities.”

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Daily papers: an artist’s crafty emojis

The Guardian: Kashia Kennedy uses a scalpel, tweezers and double-sided tape to create these tiny works, which easily fit in the palm of a hand for her #emojieveryday on Instagram.

“For some reason in 80-plus days I haven’t been able to bear the thought of skipping a day. I’d be so annoyed with myself.”


The inventor of emoji on his famous creations

The Guardian: MoMA in New York has just added the first emoji to their collection – Shigetaka Kurita explains how he designed them.

The original set of 176 emojis, acquired by MoMA

“I was part of a team that spent about two years designing the first emoji for the launch of i-mode [NTT DoCoMo’s mobile internet system] in 1999. It limited users to up to 250 characters in an email, so we thought emoji would be a quick and easy way for them to communicate. Plus using only words in such a short message could lead to misunderstandings … It’s difficult to express yourself properly in so few characters.”


[Updated: Making this a Guardian / emoji trifecta post.]

The Emojibator: how a euphemistic fruit became an actual sex toy

The idea of turning an eggplant (emoji-speak for penis) into a vibrator started out as a late-night joke. Now founder Jaime Jandler can’t make enough.

The Emojibator

“Our mission is to destigmatize masturbation and promote healthy sexuality” – one emoji-themed sex toy at a time. “We don’t think sex needs to be taken seriously all the time,” he added. “So we’ll make more unique products that are both intimate and silly.”

See also

  • That emoji does not mean what you think it means — Since emoji are designed differently across platforms, sometimes your text messages might get lost in translation.
  • 100 new emoji, by Avery Monsen — featuring: ‘A Box Which Must Never Be Opened’, ‘Three Worms Pretending To Be One Long Worm’ and ‘A Spectre Rises From A Seven Layer Fiesta Dip’.
Craft and creativity

Kashia Kennedy’s #emojieveryday & Shigetaka Kurita talks about designing the original emojis & Jaime Jandler’s ‘Emojibator’

“I don’t accept that the use of emoji is a sign that people are losing the ability to communicate with words, or that they have a limited vocabulary. And it’s not even a generational thing … People of all ages understand that a single emoji can say more about their emotions than text. Emoji have grown because they meet a need among mobile phone users.” — Shigetaka Kurita

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Shape of things to come

Forte Prenestino: a place of meeting, resistance, research and projects

Forte Prenestino entrance

The entrance, after crossing the drawbridge, to Rome’s Forte Prenestino.

The cutting of the chain that locked the entry gate marked the beginning of thirty years of self-management of this space as a squat.

The biggest social centre in Europe

Abitare: Today, once you pass the drawbridge, you enter into a labyrinth-like structure with the underground and ground floors of the building alternating between multiple spaces dedicated to culture and social activities, while the upper floor is where the homes and dormitories are located.

Here, apart from numerous political and social activities, many artistic events have been organised.

Fortopia

Fortopìa book cover.

Fortopia [free PDF and ebook downloads] tells the story of Forte Prenestino. A self-published book without a sale price, edited by a self-run publisher and with graphics by Valerio Bindi, it is made up of texts and images – some previously seen and some not – that celebrate the three decades of occupation of this place of meeting, resistance, research and projects.

(via ARCHatlas)

See also

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BB8 concept sketch

BB8 concept sketch

Industrial Light and Magic’s visual development portfolio for The Force Awakens has some fascinating pre-production artwork I hadn’t seen yet.

Some of the images are quite familiar while others show variations of events we saw in the finished film.

Some of the most interesting images are of places or events that I can’t quite identify…

“Each artist began to explore his individual response, and collectively, we began to answer, with our words and art. Out of our brainstorming sessions emerged visual imagery of where we might want to go and what it would look like when we got there. We were not merely illustrating scenes that already existed: we were initiating storytelling concepts through the visual images themselves.” Rick Carter, co-production designer, Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Portraits of our old heroes, and new villains…

Early concept art for Kylo Ren, and a dramatic artist’s impression of his finished design as it would appear in the first trailer.

Kylo Ren’s ship, the Finalizer.

While there are undeniable similarities to Tatooine, Jakku is a world with its own history and industry, explored in these location concepts.

Various other scenes from The Force Awakens, as imagined by the art department.

See also

Light-based media

ILM’s concept art for ‘The Force Awakens’

“The ILM Art Department continues to revolutionize film design today, coupling classical technique with the very bleeding edge of technology. Acclaimed directors like Steven Spielberg, James Cameron and J.J. Abrams work hand-in-hand with the best art directors and artists in the film industry, exploring ideas and iterating on those ideas until their vision is realized, making the unreal real and the impossible possible.”

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The Art of Firewatch

Campo Santo artist Jane Ng delves into the process for creating the art of Firewatch!

How the team at Campo Santo turned Olly Moss’s very graphic 2D art style into a 3D world that can be explored in first-person.

In this video Jane Ng recreates her talk from GDC 2015 in which she breaks down how the visual style of Firewatch was accomplished by looking at three elements in detail: layers of colour, strong shapes and narrative details.

See also

Light-based media

The art of Firewatch

Creating the art of Firewatch: A recreation of Jane Ng’s talk from Game Developers Conference 2015.

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Cosmo Wenman: The Times reports that artists Al-badri and Nelles used a modified Microsoft Kinect scanner hidden under clothing to gather the scan data of the bust. Following the Times story, there have been several independent and exhaustive descriptions of how their scan data simply cannot have been gathered in the way Al-badri and Nelles claim. […] They correctly point out that the Kinect scanner has fundamentally low resolution and accuracy, and that even under ideal conditions, it simply cannot acquire data as detailed as what the artists have made available. The artists’ account simply cannot be true.

All of this confusion stems from bad institutional practices regarding secrecy: The Neues Museum is hoarding 3D scans that by all rights it should share with the public, and The New York Times has allowed anonymous sources into the chain of custody of the facts of its story.


The Other Nefertiti — Artists release the 3D data of Nefertiti’s head

Nefertiti 3D print

Hyperallergic: Last October, two artists entered the Neues Museum in Berlin, where they clandestinely scanned the bust of Queen Nefertiti, the state museum’s prized gem. Three months later, they released the collected 3D dataset online as a torrent, providing completely free access under public domain to the one object in the museum’s collection off-limits to photographers.

Nora Al-Badri and Jan Nikolai Nelles

Nora Al-Badri and Jan Nikolai Nelles

“The head of Nefertiti represents all the other millions of stolen and looted artifacts all over the world currently happening, for example, in Syria, Iraq, and in Egypt,” Al-Badri said.

Updated March 9, 2016 with the news that this story is likely a hoax.

See also

  • The story of “Sweetie” — How a computer-generated 10-year old girl from the Philippines caught over 1,000 pedophiles in only two months.
  • The New Aesthetic and its PoliticsA photograph of Eric Schmidt wearing a flak jacket – as he does in his Twitter avatar – is a spur to investigate the circumstances of the photograph and the self-presentation of the corporation. It was taken on a visit to Iraq in 2009, when Google promised to digitise what remains of the National Museum’s collection, raising further questions about the digitisation and subsequent ownership of cultural patrimony, and of Google’s involvement in political activity and international diplomacy through its Google Ideas think-tank, which actively supports a programme of regime change in certain parts of the world.
Shape of things to come

Artists covertly scan bust of Nefertiti; release the 3D model for free online

“The Other Nefertiti” is an artistic intervention by the two German artists Nora Al-Badri and Jan Nikolai Nelles. Al-Badri and Nelles scanned the head of Nefertiti clandestinely in the Neues Museum Berlin without permission of the Museum and they hereby announce the release of the 3D data of Nefertitis head under a Creative Commons Licence.

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The Garden of Earthly Delights by Jheronimus Boschan online interactive adventure.

Hieronymus van Aken honed his skills to become a world-famous artist. Once his fame had spread outside the city walls, he would sign his work with ‘Hieronymus Bosch’, after the name of his native city.

The Garden of Earthly Delights is a story about morals and sin in a particular time. The painting however is timeless. The journey that the visitor sets out on in the interactive documentary is a personal one. Beneath the surface we aim to invite the visitor to reflect upon and question their sins and morals.

(via)

See also: Classic paintings brought to life & Ben Sack’s mad maps.

Craft and creativity

Explore ‘The Garden of Earthly Delights’ in high resolution

“In the late Middle Ages, a master-painter lived in the south of the Netherlands. […] Bosch was out to amuse and surprise us, he wanted us to enjoy the sight of this multitude of figures, animals, plants and objects.”

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Jill Pelto - Climate change art

Bangor Daily News: Jill Pelto, an artist and scientist, recently completed a project as part of her honors thesis that explores the issues of human-induced climate change she has studied with her father over many years of study.

“I call it environmental art,” she said. “The way I use it is specifically to communicate particular issues.”

Jill Pelto made it her mission to show others the facts through unique watercolors and screen prints that illustrate the effects of climate change by integrating scientific data with her own unique artwork.

“I incorporated a graph with data points and used some sort of illustration to give a narrative about what the piece was about,” Jill Pelto said. “A lot of scientists don’t know how to communicate their research. … Since I’m involved in both the science world and the art world, I think I have a unique ability to bridge those.”

Climate Central: Her father, Mauri Pelto, is a glacier researcher who has worked in Washington’s North Cascades for decades. Glaciers there have been receding at an alarming rate, including a huge drop in 2015 following the hottest year on record for the region. The warm year also caused a large portion of precipitation to fall as rain rather than snow, further shrinking glaciers across the region.

Summer trips to the region have been a family affair since Jill was in high school and they’re what piqued her interest in making climate impacts clear.

(via Kottke)

See also

Craft and creativity

Jill Pelto: Climate change art

These paintings combine imagery from the natural world with hard data showing the impact climate change is having.

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Delve.tv: All of history’s greatest figures achieved success in almost exactly the same way. But rather than celebrating this part of the creative process we ignore it. A series of video essays by Adam Westbrook.

The Long Game Part 1: Why Leonardo DaVinci Was No Genius

Do you ever have that feeling that everyone else is more successful than you?
If you think that’s bad – try being Leonardo Da Vinci.

The Long Game Part 2: The Missing Chapter

This missing chapter in the story of success reveals the secret to doing meaningful work. But in the modern world, full of distraction, do we have what it takes to do great things?

The Long Game Part 3: Painting in the Dark

In this new video essay, I’ve taken a look at the forgotten difficult years of another celebrated artist and wondered what it means for creative people working today.

See also

Craft and creativity

The Long Game: The struggle for art in a world obsessed with popularity

A series of video essays by Adam Westbrook: All of history’s greatest figures achieved success in almost exactly the same way. But rather than celebrating this part of the creative process we ignore it.

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(via Boing Boing)

See also: ‘Forensic retrocomputing’ discovers previously unknown Andy Warhol Amiga art from 1985

Craft and creativity

The best Logos from the Commodore Amiga Scene

A collection by Christian Kirchesch: “Originally this was supposed to be an article about the Top 20 Logos from Commodore Amiga. It ended up with 165. The more I digged into it, the more precious gems I found.”

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Mummy Brown and Other Historical Colors

Korwin Briggs looks at the history of some fascinating colours with this ‘digital approximation of paint-blobs-on-paper’. There is more information in his blog post. Mummy Brown itself was pretty popular…

it tended to crack with age, and people stopped making it partly because manufacturers started running out of mummies and partly because artists realized their paint was people.

See also: Pantone announces new colour: ‘Minion Yellow’ (not made from dead Minions!)

Craft and creativity

Mummy Brown and other historical colours

“Veritable Hokum is a comic about mostly history, maybe science, and possibly some other stuff too. Think of it as a comic-encyclopedia, or a picture-almanac.”

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Hyperallergic: The book is structured after Perry’s lectures, with each chapter exploring a different theme. “Democracy Has Bad Taste” charts the power players of the art world (curators, dealers, critics, etc). “Beating the Bounds” and “Nice Rebellion, Welcome In!” examine shock tactics, the avant-garde, and the market’s co-option of rebellion. The final chapter, “I Found Myself in the Art World,” is a personal account of the artist’s creative principles, as well as a celebration of art education.

“It’s easy to feel insecure around art and its appreciation, as though we cannot enjoy certain artworks if we don’t have a lot of academic and historical knowledge. But if there’s one message that I want you to take away it’s that anybody can enjoy art and anybody can have a life in the arts – even me! For even I, an Essex transvestite potter, have been let in by the artworld mafia.”
Grayson Perry

Craft and creativity

Playing to the Gallery: Helping contemporary art in its struggle to be understood

“Accompanied by 35 David Shrigley–esque illustrations by Perry, the book is presented as a beginner’s guide to the machinations of the art world.” — Hyperallergic

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Is the Parthenon designed after the Golden Ratio? NOPE!
Craft and creativity

The Golden Ratio is total nonsense

Co.Design: The Golden Ratio: Design’s Biggest Myth

Those who believe the golden ratio is the hidden math behind beauty are falling for a 150-year-old scam. The golden ratio has any relationship to aesthetics at all comes primarily from two people, one of whom was misquoted, and the other of whom was just making shit up.

The first guy was Luca Pacioli, a Franciscan friar who wrote a book called ‘De Divina Proportione’ back in 1509, which was named after the golden ratio. Weirdly, in his book, Pacioli didn’t argue for a golden ratio-based theory of aesthetics as it should be applied to art, architecture, and design: he instead espoused the Vitruvian system of rational proportions. The golden ratio view was misattributed to Pacioli in 1799.

The other guy was Adolf Zeising, a German psychologist who argued that the golden ratio was a universal law that described “beauty and completeness in the realms of both nature and art… which permeates, as a paramount spiritual ideal, all structures, forms and proportions, whether cosmic or individual, organic or inorganic, acoustic or optical.”

He was a long-winded guy. The only problem with Zeising was he saw patterns where none exist. For example, Zeising argued that the golden ratio could be applied to the human body by taking the height from a person’s navel to his toes, then dividing it by the person’s total height. These are just arbitrary body parts, crammed into a formula.

Continue reading

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The Meat Popsicle Fan Art Book is a book of illustrations and comics from 80 artists in tribute to The Fifth Element.

For more artwork see fifthelementbook.tumblr.com

Craft and creativity

‘Meat Popsicle’ is a Fifth Element fan art book

The Meat Popsicle Fan Art Book is a 156 page compilation of both illustrations and comics from 80 artists in tribute to the movie: The Fifth Element.

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Vincent Debanne, Battleship

Battleship is a photo series by artist Vincent Debanne:

“I show this gathering of yachts as a naval battle, because that’s what it is, a balance of power, a fight. Photomontage gives me the opportunity to reveal, to exaggerate this underlying violence, the violence of economic war.”

“My photo series always play with realism: the documentary side of my images is essential. It has to be plausible at first sight. That’s because my work is not fanciful but seeks to interrogate reality, often in a sociological and political perspective. It engages in a dialectical relationship with reality.”

(via Creative Applications)

Shape of things to come

Battleships for the super rich

Vincent Debanne uses image manipulation to turn luxury yachts into formidable warships and the bays of Antibes and of St-Tropez into theaters of war, while also providing a commentary on some of our world’s current economic, social and political issues.

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io9 spoke to Nick Bonner, founder of Koryo Tours who have been bringing travellers to North Korea since 1993. Bonner commissioned an architect to create a series of designs imagining how a future North Korea might accommodate a huge influx of tourists:

Many buildings in North Korea have what we in the West would call a retro-futuristic feel, so something that we have seen before, except this time we were pushing the eco side of it all.

The project was commissioned in-house – an experiment between Koryo Tours and the North Korean architects, and looking at the future of sustainable tourism. When we started taking the first tours to North Korea in 1993, only a small handful of people were visiting, but now we take over 2,000 a year (more than half of all the foreigners who visit). It still remains the least-visited country in the world, but also one of the most interesting experiences possible.

Shape of things to come

How an architect who has never left North Korea imagines the future

“You only need to walk around Pyongyang to see buildings that express originality within the limitations of what is allowed there, and what is actually achievable in terms of the available technology (for example, no glass-curtain walls, and most buildings still built with concrete and reinforcement bars).” — Nick Bonner, Koryo Tours

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Magic Highway

Paleo-Future:

Kevin Kidney has uploaded some amazing Magic Highway, U.S.A. images taken straight from publicity stills of the era.

(via Overhead Compartment)

Craft and creativity

Magic Highway

“On May 14, 1958 the Disneyland TV program ran an episode called “Magic Highway, U.S.A.” It examined the past, present and (paleo)future of transportation.” — Paleo-Future

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Pixel Perfect: The story of eBoy

A mini-documentary from The Verge about Steffen Sauerteig, Kai Vermehr and Svend Smital, better known as eBoy.

“That’s always the first question people ask: ‘Don’t you get bored?’ I never really got that. You would never ask a photographer if he gets bored taking photos. Pixels are just a tool just like a camera. The technique doesn’t really matter.”

Steffan

Mountain logo

Mountain

you are mountain – you are god

A mountain simulator by David OReilly for iOS, Mac & PC, coming June 21st 2014 for $1, €1, £1.

Features

• no controls
• automatic save
• audio on/off switch
• time moves forward
• things grow and things die
• nature expresses itself
• ~ 50 hours of gameplay
• once generated, you cannot be regenerated

(via The Verge)

Light-based media

Mountain

A Mountain Simulator, Relax em’ up, Art Horror game created by David OReilly, the genius behind that amazing ‘Adventure Time’ episode and that crazy game in ‘Her’.

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