Planting and Payoff – Featuring Mad Max: Fury Road

Chez Lindsay: I wanted to do a brief overview of three non-dialogue elements from Mad Max: Fury Road — The silver spray, Max’s blood and Max’s boot. Your basic narrative planting and payoff will include a setup, a reminder, and the payoff.

See also: Other posts on this blog about Fury Road

Pre-CGI Footage From MAD MAX: FURY ROAD

I’ve posted quite a lot of Mad Max: Fury Road stuff on this blog (for which I make no apologies).

  • Marketing: Mad Max Fury Road: a trailer retrospective — If there were ever that managed to deliver on the intensity and sustained visual interest of its trailers…
  • Editing: Mad Max: Center FramedBy using “Eye Trace” and “Crosshair Framing” techniques during the shooting, the editor could keep the important visual information vital in one spot… the Center of the Frame.
  • Sound design: Hearing Mad Max: Fury RoadThis film uses sound to enhance and add texture to the story in order to create an auditory post-apocalyptic world full of chaos, adrenaline, and suspense.
  • Visual effects: VFX breakdown for Mad Max: Fury Road — The incredible work of Brave New World VFX.

Fury Road VFX breakdown

Hearing Mad Max: Fury Road

Zackery Ramos-Taylor: First supercut of my “Best Sound Editing Oscar Nominees 2016” series focusing on the various uses of sound throughout Mad Max: Fury Road.

This film uses sound to enhance and add texture to the story in order to create an auditory post-apocalyptic world full of chaos, adrenaline, and suspense. From hearing the sound of the protagonist slowly rising from the sand to mechanized vehicles exploding one after another, this film seeks to add sound to every action shown.

(via Fubiz)

More Max

Fury Road poster

If there’s any movie that managed to deliver on the intensity and sustained visual interest of its trailer, it is Mad Max: Fury Road. For no particular reason–other than I really wanted to because I think about them all the time–here are the trailers for that film again.

Enjoy ten minutes of trailer perfection.

Comic-Con First Look — 27 Jul 2014

Official Theatrical Teaser Trailer — 10 Dec 2014

Official Main Trailer — 31 Mar 2015

Official Retaliate Trailer — 29 Apr 2015

(Personally, that final trailer is my favourite.)

See also: The editing of Mad Max: Fury Road, Visual effects breakdown for Mad Max: Fury Road and all the other posts on this blog tagged ‘trailers’.

Light-based media

Mad Max Fury Road: a trailer retrospective

“From director George Miller, originator of the post-apocalyptic genre and mastermind behind the legendary “Mad Max” franchise, comes “Mad Max: Fury Road,” a return to the world of the Road Warrior, Max Rockatansky.”

Gallery

The Editing of MAD MAX: Fury Road

Vashi Nedomansky: One of the many reasons MAD MAX: FURY ROAD is so successful as an action film is the editing style. By using “Eye Trace” and “Crosshair Framing” techniques during the shooting, the editor could keep the important visual information vital in one spot… the Center of the Frame. Because almost every shot was center framed, comprehending the action requires no hunting of each new shot for the point of interest. The viewer doesn’t need 3 or 4 frames to figure out where to look. It’s like watching an old hand-drawn flip book whiz by. The focus is always in the same spot!

See also: Michael Bay – What is Bayhem?, Every Frame a Painting – The Quadrant System and other posts tagged ‘filmmaking’.

The Secret World of Foley

Witness the magic of moviemaking and journey into the little known world of Foley Artists, who bring films to life with their perfectly-timed sound-effects.

See also

Composition In Storytelling

Lewis Bond: The cinema screen is just another canvas for an artist to create images. Composition is the tool that gives those images structure and purpose.

See also

Editing as Punctuation in Film

A video essay by Max Tohline:

In January 2014 Kathryn Schulz published an article in Vulture called “The Five Best Punctuation Marks in Literature.”

It got me thinking about what the five best “punctuation marks” in film might look like. I wanted to assemble a video essay with a rapidfire list of nominees of great moments of editing-as-punctuation in film. But as I started putting it together, the project grew into a twofold piece: an analysis of and response to Schulz’s article as well as an attempt to spur new insights about editing by examining it through the metaphor of punctuation.

So, here it is: 20 minutes long, clips from 100 films (101 if you count that Woody Allen quotes Duck Soup in Hannah and her Sisters), and, I hope, an inspiration to anyone else who loves film on a formal level and believes, as Bazin did, that the language of cinema isn’t done being invented yet.

See also

  • Film School’d on movie editingIn less than 7 minutes (and plenty of cuts), we’ll show you just how important editing is to the creation of film: from the first stop trick to today.
  • Pudovkin’s 5 Editing Techniques — A brief look at some of Vsevolod Pudovkin’s theories on editing as well as some examples from more recent movies.
  • The Editing of MAD MAX: Fury Road — By using “Eye Trace” and “Crosshair Framing” techniques during the shooting, the editor could keep the important visual information vital in one spot… the Center of the Frame.

(via kottke.org)

Playground, Italy

Matty Brown: Met a bunch of amazing Italian strangers in the northern region of Trentino, Italy who took me way up into the Italian alps to go hiking and mountain biking. People have been asking me to make a sports video, so thought it would be fun to try it out! A week of run and gun fun! I feel like I now have a second family deep in the mountains of Italy!

Creating Killer Transitions →