Space Station Fisheye Fly-Through 4K (Ultra HD)

NASA: Join us for a fly-through of the International Space Station. Produced by Harmonic exclusively for NASA TV UHD, the footage was shot in Ultra High Definition (4K) using a fisheye lens for extreme focus and depth of field.

(via Kottke)

See also: Stunning 4K timelapse of Earth from the ISS

AuthaGraph World Map

This Map of the World Just Won Japan’s Prestigious Design Award

Spoon & Tamago: Tokyo-based architect and artist Hajime Narukawa has a problem with our current map and he’s been working for years to try and fix it. In 1569 geographer Gerardus Mercator revealed his world map and, to this day, it’s the generally accepted image we have of this planet. But it has major flaws in that it dramatically distorts the sizes of Antarctica and Greenland.

AuthaGraph 'globe'

Narukawa developed a map projection method called AuthaGraph (and founded a company of the same name in 2009) which aims to create maps that represent all land masses and seas as accurately as possible. Narukawa points out that in the past, his map probably wasn’t as relevant. A large bulk of the 20th century was dominated by an emphasis on East and West relations. But with issues like climate change, melting glaciers in Greenland and territorial sea claims, it’s time we establish a new view of the world: one that equally perceives all interests of our planet.

See also

  • The AuthaGraph World Map shows there are no “four corners of the earth”, winner of the Good Design Grand Award.
  • Founded in 2007, Spoon & Tamago is an international blog that is based out of New York City and Tokyo Japan. It is written by artist and writer Johnny Strategy. Drawing from an extensive multicultural database and resources, Spoon & Tamago attempts to comprehensively cover all aspects of Japanese design from fine art and architecture to product and graphic design.
Shape of things to come

The AuthaGraph world map: A new way to look at the world

“The 2016 Good Design Award results were announced recently with awards going to over 1000 entries in several different categories. But the coveted Grand Award of Japan’s most well-known design award, given to just 1 entry, was announced today. […] This year, the grand prize went to a world map.” — Spoon & Tamago

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The Daily Spoon

The Daily Spoon

The past year [2014] Stian spent most of his time exploring the unique organic qualities of wood and how adding of a function can beautifully refine a piece of wood. The project consists of 365 unique hand carved spoons made from various types of wood. One carved everyday through a year.

(via Kottke)

See also

  • Velocipedia: Bikes drawn hastily from memory, realised by a product designer — These weird and wonderful bike designs were produced by product designer Gianluca Gimini, based on designs he had solicited from friends and strangers over several years.
  • The Toyota Setsuna (Japanese for “moment”) is a roadster concept car made from cedar and birch and built using a traditional Japanese carpentry technique known as “okuriari” that doesn’t involve nails or screws but relies on perfectly carved joints to hold the components together.
  • Primitive Technology: Making a bow and arrow“I made a bow and arrows in the wild using only natural materials and primitive tools I’d made previously from scratch (as usual). The tools used were a celt stone hatchet, a stone chisel, various stone blades and fire sticks.”
Craft and creativity

The Daily Spoon

“By repeating the production of a spoon every day for a longer period of time (365 days), the goal is to challenge and explore a spoons aesthetic and functional qualities.”

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How a Word gets into the Merriam-Webster dictionary

To decide which words to include in the dictionary and to determine what they mean, Merriam-Webster editors study the language as it’s used. They carefully monitor which words people use most often and how they use them.

See also

Use your words

Merriam-Webster: How a word gets into the dictionary

This is one of the questions Merriam-Webster editors are most often asked.
The answer is simple: usage.

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Daily papers: an artist’s crafty emojis

The Guardian: Kashia Kennedy uses a scalpel, tweezers and double-sided tape to create these tiny works, which easily fit in the palm of a hand for her #emojieveryday on Instagram.

“For some reason in 80-plus days I haven’t been able to bear the thought of skipping a day. I’d be so annoyed with myself.”


The inventor of emoji on his famous creations

The Guardian: MoMA in New York has just added the first emoji to their collection – Shigetaka Kurita explains how he designed them.

The original set of 176 emojis, acquired by MoMA

“I was part of a team that spent about two years designing the first emoji for the launch of i-mode [NTT DoCoMo’s mobile internet system] in 1999. It limited users to up to 250 characters in an email, so we thought emoji would be a quick and easy way for them to communicate. Plus using only words in such a short message could lead to misunderstandings … It’s difficult to express yourself properly in so few characters.”


[Updated: Making this a Guardian / emoji trifecta post.]

The Emojibator: how a euphemistic fruit became an actual sex toy

The idea of turning an eggplant (emoji-speak for penis) into a vibrator started out as a late-night joke. Now founder Jaime Jandler can’t make enough.

The Emojibator

“Our mission is to destigmatize masturbation and promote healthy sexuality” – one emoji-themed sex toy at a time. “We don’t think sex needs to be taken seriously all the time,” he added. “So we’ll make more unique products that are both intimate and silly.”

See also

  • That emoji does not mean what you think it means — Since emoji are designed differently across platforms, sometimes your text messages might get lost in translation.
  • 100 new emoji, by Avery Monsen — featuring: ‘A Box Which Must Never Be Opened’, ‘Three Worms Pretending To Be One Long Worm’ and ‘A Spectre Rises From A Seven Layer Fiesta Dip’.
Craft and creativity

Kashia Kennedy’s #emojieveryday & Shigetaka Kurita talks about designing the original emojis & Jaime Jandler’s ‘Emojibator’

“I don’t accept that the use of emoji is a sign that people are losing the ability to communicate with words, or that they have a limited vocabulary. And it’s not even a generational thing … People of all ages understand that a single emoji can say more about their emotions than text. Emoji have grown because they meet a need among mobile phone users.” — Shigetaka Kurita

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South Park – Language and Censorship

Kaptainkristian: A look at the animated series that used vulgarity in language to reflect the reality of our lives.

“As a former child myself, I can tell you that awareness overpowers ignorance.”

See also: The Philosophy of South Park — Wisecrack explores South Park’s themes of politically correct (PC) culture, gentrification, advertising, social justice, safe spaces and narcissism.

Tetris, by Box Brown

Tetris: The Games People Play, by Box Brown

Alexey Pajitnov had big ideas about games. In 1984, he created Tetris in his spare time while developing software for the Soviet government. Once Tetris emerged from behind the Iron Curtain, it was an instant hit. Nintendo, Atari, Sega—game developers big and small all wanted Tetris. A bidding war was sparked, followed by clandestine trips to Moscow, backroom deals, innumerable miscommunications, and outright theft.

In this graphic novel,New York Times–bestselling author Box Brown untangles this complex history and delves deep into the role games play in art, culture, and commerce. For the first time and in unparalleled detail, Tetris: The Games People Play tells the true story of the world’s most popular video game.

See also

Craft and creativity

The true story of the world’s most popular video game: Tetris

This is a lovely book too. Mine came with a bookmark and numbered print.

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What is Shutter Speed, Shutter Angle and How to get the Film Look

Wolfcrow: In this video and article we’ll cover what shutter speeds and shutter angles are, how the shutter speed or shutter angle can be used to control motion and exposure, and which settings to use to get the “film look”.

This is how we’ve been programmed after more than a century of watching film.

24p

How to measure typographic accessibility

Fontsmith: The illustrations use one of our most accessible typefaces FS Me which was researched and developed with charity Mencap and designed specifically to improve legibility for people with learning disabilities.

See also

Use your words

How to measure typographic accessibility

“Accessibility in typography is not an exact science and there is no such thing as either accessible or not. It is better to imagine a sliding scale where certain speciality typefaces are highly accessible at one end and some eg. script or display fonts are very inaccessible at the other end. Most fonts lie somewhere in the middle.” — Fontsmith

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No More Tofu

Google Noto Fonts

When text is rendered by a computer, sometimes characters are displayed as “tofu”. They are little boxes to indicate your device doesn’t have a font to display the text.

Google has been developing a font family called Noto, which aims to support all languages with a harmonious look and feel. Noto is Google’s answer to tofu. The name noto is to convey the idea that Google’s goal is to see “no more tofu”. Noto has multiple styles and weights, and is freely available to all.

Monotype: Creating Noto for Google

Monotype: A typeface five years in the making, Google Noto spans more than 100 writing systems, 800 languages, and hundreds of thousands of characters. A collaborative effort between Google and Monotype, the Noto typeface is a truly universal method of communication for billions of people around the world accessing digital content.

Malayalam and Devanagari in-use on Android devices

Above: Malayalam and Devanagari in-use on Android devices

TechCrunch: To be sure, there was a degree of skepticism when Google and Monotype embarked on this project, in my opinion well summed up in the words of Pakistani-American writer Ali Eteraz (quoted by NPR in 2014, when the project was already well underway):

“I tend to go back and forth. Is it sort of a benign — possibly even helpful — universalism that Google is bringing to the table? Or is it something like technological imperialism?”

Noto color emoji

Noto includes Android’s blobby emoji

Wired: But developing a typeface for 800 languages that feels cohesive yet respectful of each language’s cultural heritage created inherent tension. And making those fonts “unmistakably Google” is nearly impossible. The Tibetan script, for example, draws heavily from a calligraphic tradition, while English is more linear and geometric. The Arabic typeface is emphasized in left to right strokes, while French’s letters carry their weight in their vertical stems. Some fonts, like Runic, are so obscure that typographers at Monotype built the font from scratch using stone engravings for inspiration.

[Steve Matteson, Monotype’s creative director] designed Noto to be modern but friendly, with open counters, soft terminals, and strokes rooted in 5th century calligraphy. He avoided making Noto too austere, mostly because the shapes wouldn’t translate as nicely to other languages.

“It’s not easy to interpret fancy calligraphic languages like Tibetan into a Futura typeface model, which is all circles and straight lines.”

See also


(Post updated to include excerpt from the Wired article)

Use your words

Google’s Noto Project: a unified font for all languages

Google has been developing a font family called Noto, which aims to support all languages with a harmonious look and feel.

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