Pre-CGI Footage From MAD MAX: FURY ROAD

I’ve posted quite a lot of Mad Max: Fury Road stuff on this blog (for which I make no apologies).

  • Marketing: Mad Max Fury Road: a trailer retrospective — If there were ever that managed to deliver on the intensity and sustained visual interest of its trailers…
  • Editing: Mad Max: Center FramedBy using “Eye Trace” and “Crosshair Framing” techniques during the shooting, the editor could keep the important visual information vital in one spot… the Center of the Frame.
  • Sound design: Hearing Mad Max: Fury RoadThis film uses sound to enhance and add texture to the story in order to create an auditory post-apocalyptic world full of chaos, adrenaline, and suspense.
  • Visual effects: VFX breakdown for Mad Max: Fury Road — The incredible work of Brave New World VFX.

Fury Road VFX breakdown

Where the “comic book font” came from

Vox: So…why does all the writing in comic books look like that? Vox’s Phil Edwards looked into it and found an aesthetic shaped by comics culture, technology, and really cheap paper.

Comic book fonts

See also

  • Todd Klein’s websiteI’m best known in comics as a letterer, which I’ve been doing since 1977, working with writers like Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, Bill Willingham and many others, and collaborating with a host of artists.
  • Comicraft & Blambot, purveyors of fine comic book fonts.

The Marvel Symphonic Universe

Every Frame a Painting is back with a new video about the use of ‘temp music’ in modern moviemaking, particularly in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Tony Zhou: Off the top of your head, could you sing the theme from Star Wars? How about James Bond? Or Harry Potter? But here’s the kicker: can you sing any theme from a Marvel film? Despite 13 films and 10 billion dollars at the box office, the Marvel Cinematic Universe lacks a distinctive musical identity or approach. So let’s try to answer the question: what is missing from Marvel music?

Hollywood Scores & Soundtracks: What Do They Sound Like? Do They Sound Like Things?? Let’s Find Out! →

Two 1/350 scale USS Enterprises

Two fantastic models by ‘ModelChili’ that are fun to compare.

Scale Enterprise models

The carrier Enterprise had a crew of about 5,500, whereas the starship Enterprise only had a crew compliment of 430. // The carrier Enterprise was commissioned in 1961, the starship Enterprise studio model was built in 1965.

Scale Enterprise models

The carrier Enterprise took about 5 months work, and included buying extra parts such as aircraft, photoetch details, aftermarket decals, photoetch figures, resin Phalanx guns. // The starship Enterprise took about 3 months work and the only extras were some 1/350 scale figures for the bridge and shuttlebay.


This is an especially nice comparison as some of the original starship Enterprise drawings by (presumably) Matt Jefferies also used the aircraft carrier to help show the scale of his design.

USS Enterprise Space Cruiser

(I have this Polar Lights 1/350 Enterprise kit myself. I’m looking forward to making it… one day! You can probably tell from this blog that I have a bit of an obsession.)

See also

Craft and creativity

Two 1/350 scale USS Enterprise models

“The carrier Enterprise is 342m long, so at this scale it comes to 1005mm. The starship Enterprise is noted as being 289m long.”

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SLO: 3D Printed Camera

SLO: 3D Printed Camera

Amos Dudley made made his own 3D printed camera, with lens.
He has even made the design files available for download so you can print your own.

SLO is a single lens objective. SLO is the mechanical shutter. SLO is the speed of good design, and the feeling of capturing life with a camera you made yourself.

A 3D printed camera body could look like anything, but I decided to optimize the design for printing speed and material usage. Most of the larger parts are designed without overhangs in one orientation, so they can be printed without supports, straight off the build platform. Separating the body into modules let me prototype each component individually. The shutter and lens are modules, and can be swapped out for different designs without reprinting the entire camera.

Creating a lens with a 3D printer is a challenge – your typical FDM printer won’t cut it here. […] The result was mixed- the lenses looked transparent, but weren’t optically sharp. Surface reflections were still blurry, which is a sign that a surface still has microscopic grooves that scatter light.

There’s no adjustment for shutter speed, except for the speed the button is pressed by your finger.

Photo taken with the SLO 3D printed camera

Photo taken with the SLO 3D printed camera

See more photos taken with the SLO on Flickr, shot on Fujicolor Superia 400.

35mm is the most common film standard, and the natural choice for the SLO. It’s also the only film size that’s still relatively easy to get developed at a reasonable price. The choice of a film size informs many aspects of a camera’s design and function.

(via HN)

See also

Light-based media

SLO: 3D Printed Camera

“The design of the camera body evolved from a simplified massing of functional elements to refinements based on ergonomics and scale, as I learned more about the strength of the material.” — Amos Dudley

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Star Trek Facebook reactions

Facebook celebrates Star Trek’s 50th anniversary

…with a lovely cardboard Enterprise model and some custom ‘reaction’ emoticons.
(I’m not sure about the logic behind using the Vulcan salute for ‘love’ or Spock for ‘wow’.)

Lindsey Shepard: Our internal design team built the USS Enterprise image by cutting and piecing together paper by hand. Then they photographed it using a high quality camera so that it could appear in our greeting.

(via The Verge)

See also

Craft and creativity

Facebook celebrates Star Trek’s 50th anniversary

“When we caught wind that Star Trek would be celebrating 50 years this month, it got our wheels turning. We wanted to mark this fun, nostalgic moment and help the passionate community of Star Trek fans celebrate in some unique ways on Facebook.” — Lindsey Shepard

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Durlag's Tower
Light-based media

How game designers make dungeons: Durlag’s Tower

Dungeon Master’s Guide to Durlag’s Tower

Extra Credits analyses dungeon design in its Design Club series:

Learn how game designers make dungeons by looking at one of the greatest teaching examples in gaming history: Durlag’s Tower from Baldur’s Gate.

Combat, narrative, puzzle, reward

“You can break each room down into four components: Its combat component, its narrative component, its puzzle component and its reward component.”

Watch Parts 2-5 →

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William Shakespeare
Use your words

To be or not to be… original

The Guardian: The game is up: Shakespeare’s language not as original as dictionaries think

In an article for the University of Melbourne, Dr David McInnis, a Shakespeare lecturer at the institution, accuses the Oxford English Dictionary of “bias” over its citation of Shakespeare as the originator of hundreds of words in English.

“His audiences had to understand at least the gist of what he meant, so his words were mostly in circulation already or were logical combinations of pre-existing concepts.”

McInnis: If something happens “without rhyme or reason”, people are said to be quoting Shakespeare’s As You Like It, when Rosalind asks Orlando whether he is as head-over-heels in love as his rhymes suggest, and Orlando replies “Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much”.

The OED traces the phrase back to the 1400s – centuries before Shakespeare. So why do we think it’s Shakespeare’s coinage?

Probably because, as happens so frequently, Shakespeare isn’t the first to think of something, but he presents it in such a clever or memorable way, that it becomes firmly associated with his version.

McInnis also traces the roots of other famous ‘Shakespearean’ phrases like “it’s greek to me”, “a wild goose chase”, “eaten out of house and home”. It’s not all OED ‘bias’ however; the bard did have a knack for coining and popularising turns of phrase, like “to make an ass of oneself”…

To describe behaving stupidly and embarrassing yourself as “making an ass of yourself” seems like a very contemporary expression, but Shakespeare seems to have genuinely invented both the easy-to-quote phrase and a very memorable situation. In A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Bottom the Weaver is magically turned into an ass. Other characters remark upon Bottom’s transformation, but he thinks they’re just mocking him: “This is to make an ass of me, to fright me, if they could.”

See also: Churchillian drift: How great quotations find their way to famous names

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The Best Science Fiction Cinema of the 21st Century (So Far)

Plot Point Productions: Science fiction has the freedom to ponder the big questions in a variety of dramatic contexts, both in our world or a different one. The power of the genre has always been in its capacity for escapism, but also in its promotion of a conversation about who we are and what we want from ourselves and each other.

The first fifteen years of the 21st century have seen that conversation grow and splinter in many fascinating directions. A.I., cloning, conservation and the stewardship of our planet, societal alienation, space travel, love; the best sci-fi films of this century have tackled these themes and ideas while also telling stories that are rousing, unsettling, heartbreaking…and above all, human.

HP Pavilion Wave - front

HP Pavilion Wave

I really like the look of this new HP desktop. The Amazon Echo-esque form factor makes a lot of sense — if the voice assistant is the way of the future, the PC should absolutely be a speaker. And this has a B&O speaker, so it should be pretty decent too.

  • HP: HP’s newest desktops: Not your father’s PCThe small, triangular shaped HP Pavilion Wave – about 15 percent the size of a traditional tower – has a distinctive design that was formed by arranging the internal components into a layout that would be optimal for the most demanding computing tasks. On one side is the motherboard, including the processor, discrete graphics card and SSD, while a second side holds the hard drive. The third side contains the thermals – heat pipes that extract heat from the motherboard and graphics card, push it through copper pipes, across cooling fins and out the machine’s top.
  • Windows Blog: HP announces new Pavilion Wave and Elite Slice with Windows 10For customers who want a PC that can fit into small places, the new offering is a beautiful and compact design with the power of a full-sized desktop, running on Windows 10. The dual microphones enable voice integration with your digital personal assistant, Cortana.

HP Pavilion Wave

  • The Verge: HP’s new PC looks like a speakerWhile the Wave isn’t a speaker, HP is still advertising its prowess as one. The computer has a large central speaker, which has its sound sent out in all directions by blasting against the sloped top cover of the PC. It’s a neat trick — and, during a brief demo in a small space, it did appear to get pretty loud — but it’s probably not a replacement for a dedicated speaker.
  • CNET: The HP Wave is a living room PC built for killer soundInside, you’ll find current-gen Intel Core i-series processors, up to 2TB of storage, and even optional AMD graphics for video editing and maybe a little light gaming, plus HP says it’ll drive two 4K monitors at once.

HP Pavilion Wave starts at $530 and is expected by the end of September, 2016.

See also

Shape of things to come

HP Pavilion Wave: Stylish PC that is also a B&O speaker

“The quality-woven exterior material was carefully created to allow for broad-spectrum audio transmission while retaining the texture and design appeal of fabric. The vented sides at the top of the device allow sound to project out.” –HP

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