5 Great Science Fiction Anime You (Probably) Haven’t Seen

Mother’s Basement: Looking for a new SciFi anime to watch? Here are five more obscure shows that you can really sink your teeth into.

  1. Tokyo Magnitude 8.0Middle school student Mirai Onozawa is dissatisfied with her family circumstances and, in a moment of frustration, wishes to tear everything apart. Unfortunately, these destructive thoughts seem to come true in the form of a magnitude 8.0 earthquake just a few moments later.
  2. KaibaIt is now possible to store memory data, so that the death of your body is not actually “death.” As memories are stored in databanks, they can be “transferred” to new bodies. Because so-called “memory trading” now occurs, it is now possible to steal memories and illegally alter them.
  3. The Irresponsible Captain TylorJusty Ueki Tylor had his life all planned out: join the military, get a cushy desk job, and then retire with a big fat pension check. The perfect plan… until he wandered into a hostage situation and somehow managed to save an admiral! Now Tylor – a man who wouldn’t know what discipline was if it bit him on the backside – has been made Captain of the space cruiser Soyokaze.
  4. Level EIn the present day, hundreds of extraterrestrial species walk the Earth. Some are pacifistic, others violent. Some are here for research purposes, others are career criminals. However, humans don’t know they are here.
  5. Dennou CoilEleven years after the introduction of internet-connected, augmented reality eyeglasses and visors, Yuuko Okonogi moves with her family to Daikoku City, the technological center of the emerging half-virtual world. Yuuko joins her grandmother’s “investigation agency” comprised of children equipped with virtual tools and powerful metatags. She quickly crosses paths with Yuuko Amasawa, an expert hacker of the virtual environment, as Amasawa relentlessly seeks to “unlock” the mystery of a computer virus that emerges from an inaccessible corrupted space.

Broadcast Bionics VOX & MOR

Dan McQuillin of Broadcast Bionics explains VOX, their object-based production software that allows audio producers to quickly edit with transcribed text. Then we see MOR (Multi-Object Recording), which allows producers to ‘unmix’ what was recorded live and re-mix it, for both audio and video.

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How To Speak On The Internet (MMM™)

Satchell Drakes: After spending quite a few years on Twitter, I’ve had my fair share of getting pulled into toxic moments. I’ve also made some of my closest friends on there. I wanted to put together a resource that might help people share their worldview in a manner that is effective and conscious of their context. Mike McHargue of The Liturgists Podcast essentially did all of the work and tackled this issue the best with a matrix of four questions to help with just that. Here’s essentially an overdramatic Retweet of that matrix.

Mike's Motive Matrix

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Hyper-Reality by Keiichi Matsuda

Hyper-Reality presents a provocative and kaleidoscopic new vision of the future, where physical and virtual realities have merged, and the city is saturated in media.

(via)

Shape of things to come

Hyper-Reality

One vision of our AR future.

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Archicards

Architectural playing card designs by Italian architect Federico Babina.

“When I was young, I used to build a house with cards: why not use architecture to design cards?”

(via The Guardian)

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Craft and creativity

Architectural playing cards

“Maybe I use a building or a window… something that represents them. If you look at a simple detail of the cards you can find the architect” — Federico Babina in The Guardian

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Find Out How to Edit Your Film Using a Video Game Controller

No Film School: Editor Casey Faris shows us how he programmed his PC game controller to be used with Adobe Premiere Pro.

Xpadder

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Cristian Lascu (left)

BBC Earth: Movile Cave has been cut off for millions of years. Its air is thick with harmful gases, yet it is home to an array of strange animals.

Despite a complete absence of light and a poisonous atmosphere, the cave is crawling with life. There are unique spiders, scorpions, woodlice and centipedes, many never before seen by humans, and all of them owe their lives to a strange floating mat of bacteria.

Strangely, the worse the air gets the more animals there are. It’s not at all obvious why that should be, or how the animals survive at all.

Without any signs of water reaching the deep cave from the surface, it is unclear how the animals in the cave survives. Tests have shown that the water flowing in does not contain any food particles. Instead, the food comes from the strange frothy foam sitting on top of the water. This floating film, which looks like wet tissue paper and can even be torn like paper, contains millions upon millions of bacteria known as “autotrophs”.

In 1996, researchers categorised the animals in the cave. They included 3 species of spider, a centipede, 4 species of isopod (the group that includes woodlice), a leech never seen anywhere else in the world, and an unusual-looking insect called a waterscorpion.

See also

Humans and other animals

Movile Cave: The unique life isolated deep underground for 5.5 million years

“Almost 30 years after its discovery, Movile Cave remains perhaps the most isolated ecosystem on the planet. It surely has many more secrets to give up. There are plenty more organisms buried in the cave’s sediments, waiting to be identified, and they could help us understand some of our deepest questions about the nature of life.” — BBC Earth

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Shape of things to come

Competition to map the first human outpost on Mars

National Geographic: Sure, NASA has plenty of scientists hard at work mapping the geology of potential Martian landing sites. But designing maps to help humans navigate, study, and survive in an alien landscape will require an entirely different set of skills—the kinds of skills that cartographers, graphic artists, and people who love maps might have.

Mars-ez-coprates chasma

One of 47 possible exploration zones on Mars that could be visited by humans.

So, the International Cartographic Association is holding a competition to come up with the best map design for astronauts who would spend about a year on the surface of Mars as part of a mission proposed for the 2030s.

“This project is on the boundary between scifi, game design, graphic arts and science, like cartography is.” Henrik Hargitai, NASA planetary scientist

Mars Exploration Zones: This concept animation shows just one of many potential concepts for how the first human landing site on Mars might evolve throughout the course of multiple human expeditions to the Red Planet over a decade or more.

See also

  • ICA Call for maps: Mars Exploration Zone Map Design Competition
  • Ordnance Survey map of Mars“The planet Mars has become the latest subject in our long line of iconic OS paper maps. The one-off map, created using NASA open data and made to a 1:4,000,000 scale, is made to see if our style of mapping has potential for future Mars missions.”
  • If the Earth were 100 pixels wide, the Moon would be 3000 pixels away, and Mars… well, you’ll have to see for yourself.
  • Canyonlands National Park texture and shaded relief map — National Park Service cartographer Tom Patterson is a master of texture and shaded relief. He’s released this gorgeous map of Canyonlands National to the public domain.
  • The first relief map — [Hans Conrad Gyger’s] map of the Zurich area took 38 years to survey and paint, and is considered as one of the most beautiful cartographic works of that time. Because of its high military importance the map was kept secret, and, unfortunately, had no influence on contemporary cartography. Not until 200 years later were shaded relief maps of comparable quality and beauty produced.
  • The flag of planet Earth — Oskar Pernefeldt’s graduation project is a flag for our world, “to remind the people of Earth that we share this planet, no matter of national boundaries”.
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RetroAhoy: Quake

After his detailed history of Doom, Stuart Brown tackles Quake in this hour-long video!

Quake wasn’t perfect, but it was as good as PC gaming gets.

See also

  • RetroAhoy: Nuclear Fruit — a five part exploration of the Cold War’s effect on video games.
  • RetroAhoy: Iconic Arms — the history of famous weapons from games.
  • RetroAhoy: Open World Origins — What was the first truly open world game? What other titles set the standard along the way? And what makes them so popular today?

Textures! →

Guide to Computing

This colourful series of ten historic computers, created in close collaboration between INK and Docubyte, documents the beginning of our computing history.

Featuring such famous machines as the IBM 1401 and Alan Turing’s Pilot ACE, Guide to Computing showcases a minimalist approach to design that precedes even Apple’s contemporary motifs.

What’s more, the combination of Docubyte’s photography and INK’s skilful retouching and post-production techniques has resulted in something wholly unique: the ageing historical objects as photographed by Docubyte have been ‘digitally restored’ and returned to their original form. As a number of these computers predate modern colour photography, Guide to Computing therefore showcases them in a never before seen context.

Photography by Docubyte. Retouching by INK.

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Miscellany

Colourful digital restorations of historic computers

This colourful series of ten historic computers, created in close collaboration between INK and Docubyte, documents the beginning of our computing history.

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Every Frame a Painting: How Does an Editor Think and Feel?

Tony Zhou For the past ten years, I’ve been editing professionally. Yet one question always stumps me: “How do you know when to cut?” And I can only answer that it’s very instinctual. On some level, I’m just thinking and feeling my way through the edit. So today, I’d like to describe that process: how does an editor think and feel?

Includes a quote from legendary film editor Thelma Schoonmmaker who perfectly describes a problem I’ve long felt with today’s ultra fast cut-cut-cut movies:

“I think [modern filmmakers] are sticking stuff out there and asking you to believe it, but they’re not making you believe it.”

See also: Nicolas Winding Refn’s ‘Quadrant System’, David Fincher in the details and other posts tagged ‘filmmaking’.

Pixar – What Makes a Story Relatable

A quick look at Pixar’s approach to storytelling and character development.

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How Hello Games created the lore of No Man’s Sky

Sean Murray: With a universe as open as ours – with a near infinite number of planets out there to see – we want players to discover everything on their terms. We don’t have huge cut scenes or a traditional linear story.

There is, however, a real lore in the game. Hopefully everything you find has a reason for existing. When you see a building, we’ve tried to think of who might have built it, and why. It’s something we’re excited to see fans uncover as they play, and put their own interpretations on.

See also

  • Exploration in games — Exploration appeals to basic human instincts, and the basic joy we get from discovery makes exploration a key element for many games.
  • The WitnessYou wake up, alone, on a strange island full of puzzles that will challenge and surprise you.
  • The Art of Firewatch — Campo Santo artist Jane Ng delves into the process for creating the art of Firewatch!