Webdesigner Depot: Channel 4 reveals a bizarre rebrand

Channel 4 is today launching a major brand redesign. Masterminded by 4Creative, Channel 4’s in-house creative agency, the new identity is brave, bizarre, and striking.

Shot by Jonathan Glazer, the idents tell the story of the channel’s blocks being discovered in caves, mined from the ground, and refined in labs. They’re natural, elemental curiosities.

“The idents present the blocks as kryptonite-like. They tell the story of their origin and how they have a powerful impact on the world around them. Just as Channel 4 does. It is a story that we shall build on.”

It’s Nice That: New Channel 4 identity by creative dream team of 4Creative, Jonathan Glazer, Neville Brody and DBLG

Two new typefaces have been designed by Neville Brody. The first is Chadwick, a rounded, warm, corporate typeface. Its forms are heavily geometric and designed for readability. The second typeface is Horseferry, an unusual, disruptive display text. Horseferry uses the basic forms of Chadwick, but blends in the blocks from the ‘4‘ logo.

See also

(via & via)

Light-based media

Channel 4’s surreal new brand identity

“The broadcast media landscape is a much more complicated place than it was ten years ago, so there’s a need to stand out more than ever before.” — John Allison, 4Creative

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A Matter of Perspective — Cartographer Daniel Huffman:

What happens if you take the shoreline of a lake, cut it, and unfurl it?

The once-closed shoreline of the lake now becomes linear, providing a new perspective on a familiar feature.

Unfurling a lake

I made this map because I wanted to show space referenced against a natural feature, rather than figuring locations based on the cardinal directions of north/south/etc. I think it’s a very human perspective, grounded in how we relate to the lake, rather than how it looks from space. Rob Roth just wandered by while I was writing this and said that this depicted “configural knowledge,” so there’s your search term if you want to read the academic side of this sort of thing.

See also:

Craft and creativity

Linear lakes: These clever maps show an ‘unwrapped’ Lake Michigan and Lake Superior

“A drive around the lake becomes a reasonably straight line. Not only that, but the map is actually continuous — the roads running off the bottom of the map are the same as those coming in at the top. It provides a unique perspective on the way people arrange themselves around the lake.” — Daniel Huffman

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Silent Circle logo

Silent Circle Blackphone 2

On the surface, the phone looks like your standard 5.5-inch screened smartphone—the same size as the iPhone 6 Plus. The original Blackphone had an odd rounded back cover and “Blackphone” embossed into its plastic, and the Blackphone 2 is almost anonymous by comparison. The Silent Circle and Blackphone logos are subtly printed on its back and easily covered by a case for those who prefer not to drop a phone that screams, “I am carrying a secure phone!” into a security checkpoint x-ray machine basket.

[…] it might not have a stylus, the fastest processor, or the most powerful graphics engine, but it will serviceably perform as a smartphone while not giving you up to surveillance. The Blackphone 2 is the phone your chief information security officer will want your CEO to carry.

See also:

Shape of things to come

Paranoid Android: Silent Circle’s Blackphone 2

“Silent Circle—founded by Phil Zimmerman (creator of PGP), former Entrust Chief Technology Officer John Calas (the man behind much of the security in Mac OS X and iOS), and former Navy SEAL and security entrepreneur Mike Janke—bought out Geeksphone and absorbed the joint venture. The company hired a new CEO (former Entrust CEO and Nortel President Bill Conner), renamed and rebuilt its Android-based operating system, upgraded the infrastructure of its encrypted voice and text communications network, and built an entirely new hardware platform based on a somewhat more industry-standard chipset. All of that has led the team toward Blackphone 2.” — Ars Technica

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ZERO-DAY by beeple

The next world war will not be invisible.

After the success of STUXNET, a virus written by the United States to destroy Iranian uranium enrichment facilities, the U.S. government could no longer deny it was developing cyber weapons meant to do physical damage. With US companies and agencies under constant attack from state-sponsored Chinese hackers, it is only a matter of time before tensions boil over and more sensitive infrastructure is targeted. As more or our devices (cars, homes, etc) become connected, we will become more and more vulnerable to the physical threat of cyber warfare.

More stills on Behance
Equally awesome process video after the jump →

Playground, Italy

Matty Brown: Met a bunch of amazing Italian strangers in the northern region of Trentino, Italy who took me way up into the Italian alps to go hiking and mountain biking. People have been asking me to make a sports video, so thought it would be fun to try it out! A week of run and gun fun! I feel like I now have a second family deep in the mountains of Italy!

Creating Killer Transitions →

On a dry lakebed in Nevada, a group of friends build the first scale model of the solar system with complete planetary orbits: a true illustration of our place in the universe.

See also

Miscellany

A scale model of the Solar System

On a dry lakebed in Nevada, a group of friends build the first scale model of the solar system with complete planetary orbits: a true illustration of our place in the universe.

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A comprehensive overlook of the Nordic languages in their old world language families

Old world language family tree

Mental Floss: Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram.

(via Open Culture)

Use your words

A linguistic family tree

‘Sundberg takes this tree metaphor to a delightfully lavish extreme, tracing, say, how Indo-European linguistic roots sprouted a variety of modern-day living languages including Hindi, Portuguese, Russian, Italian — and, of course, our Language of the Future.’ — Open Culture

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Hyperallergic interviewed Vancouver-based art director and motion designer Peter Quinn:

“PQ FUI toys is meant for those situations where you just have to drop in some Fake UI bullshit to make something look a pinch more interesting, adding a little sparkle, or just saving yourself 10 minutes.”

The Zipf Mystery

The of and to. A in is I. That it, for you, was with on. As have … but be they.

The Atlantic:

Every so often scientists notice a rule or a regularity that makes no particular sense on its face but seems to hold true nonetheless. One such is a curiosity called Zipf’s Law. George Kingsley Zipf was a Harvard linguist who in the 1930s noticed that the distribution of words adhered to a regular statistical pattern. The most common word in English—”the”—appears roughly twice as often in ordinary usage as the second most common word, three times as often as the third most common, ten times as often as the tenth most common, and so on. As an afterthought, Zipf also observed that cities’ sizes followed the same sort of pattern, which became known as a Zipf distribution. Oversimplifying a bit, if you rank cities by population, you find that City No. 10 will have roughly a tenth as many residents as City No. 1, City No. 100 a hundredth as many, and so forth. (Actually the relationship isn’t quite that clean, but mathematically it is strong nonetheless.) Subsequent observers later noticed that this same Zipfian relationship between size and rank applies to many things: for instance, corporations and firms in a modern economy are Zipf-distributed.

Everything is a Remix Remastered (2015 HD)

Kirby Ferguson:

In the five years since the series launched, Everything is a Remix has been viewed over two million times and produced a popular TED Talk. Amazingly, Remix continues to change the way people think about creativity, originality, and copyright.

To celebrate the five year anniversary, I’ve polished up the original four parts and merged them into a single video. For the first time now, the whole series is available as a single video with proper transitions all the way through, unified styling, and remixed and remastered audio. Part One has been entirely rebuilt in HD.

You can get some merchandise on Kickstarter, if you feel so inclined.

Over the years there have been many requests for Everything is a Remix merchandise and I’m taking this anniversary as an opportunity to finally produce some. With your support, we’ll do a run of t-shirts and posters. There are no limits, we’ll produce and ship as many as we sell.

Update →

Everyone who lives in the trailer smokes.

“It’s like we’re being punished for something, only I can’t figure out what.”

A sad and terrifying portrait of some American lives by Stephanie McCrummen for the Washington Post: He showed them his gun. He spoke of doing ‘something crazy.’ Why do the friends Dylann Roof stayed with before the Charleston church shooting shrug about their inaction?

“Who’s here?” Jacob says, jumping up and peeking through the blinds, but the view is the same as ever — no people, an abandoned trailer next door, a skinny pine tree and some empty vodka minis in a patch of weedy grass. Beyond is the whoosh of highway traffic and the rest of Lexington County, a place that is roughly 80 percent white, the result of decades of white flight from neighboring counties and Ku Klux Klan activity, including a drive-by shooting of three black teenagers in 1996 — not that any sense of history filters into the trailer. “The KKK, that’s one thing I don’t understand,” as Joey says. “Was the KKK an actual violent thing?”

Humans and other animals

An American void

‘There are no books here, no magazines, and the wood-paneled walls are bare. A stained blue towel hangs over the window in the door. The only furniture in the living room is the couch, two side tables and a metal stool positioned in front of the TV, which is wired to two large speakers and the Xbox that one of the Meek brothers is always playing.’ — The Washington Post

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Ghost In The Shell: Identity in Space

Nerdwriter discusses Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell after last week’s exploration of Alfonso Cuarón’s Children of Men. Both video essays look at the backgrounds of these films and what they reveal about their respective worlds.

Children of Men: Don’t Ignore The Background

NASA logos
Craft and creativity

What does the red swoosh in NASA’s ‘meatball’ logo mean?

The distinctive red shape wasn’t just a designerly flourish, it was actually inspired by a model for a supersonic plane being tested in the wind tunnels at NASA’s Ames Research Center.

An Ames wind-tunnel model of a radical supersonic airplane configuration designed for efficient flight at Mach 3

From Gizmodo:

James J. Modarelli, head of the Research Reports Division at the NASA Lewis Research Center (now the NASA Glenn Research Center), was the chief designer of the NASA seal and meatball insignia. In July 1958, Modarelli attended the triennial inspection of the AAL, during which facilities and research efforts within the NACA were highlighted and discussed for invited guests in the scientific community. […] During the Ames meeting, Modarelli participated in a tour consisting of nine stops for presentations on topical research activities. At the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, he viewed an Ames exhibit featuring a discussion by Ames researchers on current advanced supersonic aircraft technology. On display was an Ames wind-tunnel model of a radical supersonic airplane configuration designed for efficient flight at Mach 3. Featuring a cambered and twisted arrow wing with an upturned nose, the sleek model deeply impressed Modarelli as a symbol of the leading-edge aeronautical efforts of the NACA.

See also

…and other posts tagged ‘space’.

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Vancouver Never Plays Itself

Every Frame a Painting: Perhaps no other city has been as thoroughly hidden from modern filmmaking as Vancouver, my hometown. Today, it’s the third biggest film production city in North America, behind Los Angeles and New York. And yet for all the movies and TV shows that are shot there, we hardly ever see the city itself. So today, let’s focus less on the movies and more on the city in the background. Press the CC button to see movie names and locations.

I’d like to visit Vancouver one day. The place has become so familiar to me from shows like The X-Files and Battlestar Galactica.

Vancouver as Caprica

Mummy Brown and Other Historical Colors

Korwin Briggs looks at the history of some fascinating colours with this ‘digital approximation of paint-blobs-on-paper’. There is more information in his blog post. Mummy Brown itself was pretty popular…

it tended to crack with age, and people stopped making it partly because manufacturers started running out of mummies and partly because artists realized their paint was people.

See also: Pantone announces new colour: ‘Minion Yellow’ (not made from dead Minions!)

Craft and creativity

Mummy Brown and other historical colours

“Veritable Hokum is a comic about mostly history, maybe science, and possibly some other stuff too. Think of it as a comic-encyclopedia, or a picture-almanac.”

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Wire Cutters

A chance encounter proves fateful for 2 robots mining on a desolate planet.

It’s like a grittier Wall-E.

Boing Boing: On Reddit, filmmaker Jack Anderson explains that the making of his film involved a “$0 budget but thousands of hours of love and about a YEAR of rendering.”

See also: Wanderers, a vision of humanity’s expansion into the Solar System.