Saturn mosaic 2008-04-06

The images you see here are (more or less) calibrated images that were released to the Planetary Data System, they are not raw jpeg processed images that immediately appear on the mission website as they’re downlinked from the spacecraft. The downside of the PDS is the data releases are delayed about 9 months in order to give the imaging team priority over analyzing data (hey, they built the cameras!). Other than that, the PDS data allow more accurate reconstruction of colors and brightnesses over the histogram-stretched jpeg images.

I’ve put up this gallery because I was somewhat underwhelmed by the frequency the Cassini Imaging Team releases color composites. Granted, there isn’t an overwhelming number of color sets available, but even when there is a chance to do color, the team often prefers grayscale. –Gordon Ugarkovic

(via io9)

Light-based media

Gordon Ugarkovic’s pictures of Saturn and her moons

Gordon Ugarkovic wanted nicer images from the Cassini mission to Saturn and the Huygens Titan probe. So he made them using nasa’s own data.

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Though race is one of those seismic issues—the stuff of movements and monuments and multiday conferences at top universities—the moments revealed in the six-word submissions are smaller in nature and much more intimate:

Brown-skinned mothers who are mistaken as the nannies of their lighter skinned children.

Blue-eyed teenagers who grow outsize afros to win easy (or at least easier) acceptance on the basketball court.

Asians with Irish last names who delight at seeing the faces of potential employers when they show up for job interviews.

And blonde women who understand why their children choose to identify as “Black-tino” out of cultural convenience but quietly die inside because they feel rejected or left out. This is all part of the crazy quilt of America. Our diversity is the marvel of the world and represents one of our greatest strengths as a nation. It heralds progress but not without pain for those who live on the knife-edge of multiple cultures.

(via @picpedant)

Humans and other animals, Shape of things to come

Visualising race, identity and change

“Official statistics can paint a useful picture. Appearance is an important aspect of the story. But to understand race—and more specifically racial ambiguity—it helps to understand those whose lives are defined by it.” — National Geographic

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The startup that makes your startup look cool: Small Empires

Sandwich is a video production company that has found the perfect tone for the moment. Dry, self-deprecating, and hilarious, while simultaneously conveying lots of information and a sense of cool that comes from being a part of the near future. We’ve covered many of the companies they crafted videos for, from Casper to Coin to Push For Pizza.

sandwichvideo.com

Wanderers – a short film by Erik Wernquist

Wanderers is a vision of humanity’s expansion into the Solar System, based on scientific ideas and concepts of what our future in space might look like, if it ever happens. The locations depicted in the film are digital recreations of actual places in the Solar System, built from real photos and map data where available.

Without any apparent story, other than what you may fill in by yourself, the idea with the film is primarily to show a glimpse of the fantastic and beautiful nature that surrounds us on our neighboring worlds – and above all, how it might appear to us if we were there.

(via @neilcocker)

Shape of things to come

Wanderers

“In ancient greek, the planets visible in the sky were collectively called “aster planetes” which means “wandering star”. It also refers to ourselves; for hundreds of thousands of years – the wanderers of the Earth. In time I hope we take that leap off the ground and permanently become wanderers of the sky. Wanderers among the wanderers.” — Erik Wernquist

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