The Meat Popsicle Fan Art Book is a book of illustrations and comics from 80 artists in tribute to The Fifth Element.

For more artwork see fifthelementbook.tumblr.com

Aesthetics

‘Meat Popsicle’ is a Fifth Element fan art book

The Meat Popsicle Fan Art Book is a 156 page compilation of both illustrations and comics from 80 artists in tribute to the movie: The Fifth Element.

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The Affair
Shape of things to come

‘1984’ stealth fashion for the under-surveillance society

It’s all a little hipster for my tastes, but I appreciate concept for this Nineteen Eighty-Four themed clothing Kickstarter.

The Affair - 1984 collection

Big Brother is real and he’s watching. Become untrackable and unhackable with UnPocket™ enabled stealth fashion. #GoDark

The UnPocket

I particularly like the UnPocket, which protects the contents from water as well as surveillance…

The Affair - Unpocket

Every piece in the ‘1984’ collection is built around a removable stealth pocket made from police-grade shielding fabrics that securely block all Cell, WiFi, GPS and RFID signals to ~100 dB.

We’re calling it the UnPocket™ in homage to Orwell because it works much like Winston Smith in the bowels of Minitrue: simply pop your phone, passport and bank cards inside and become invisible to Big Brother within seconds.

I know a tin would probably do the job just as well, but I’m thinking of backing at the £18 level to just get one of these.

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TIME assigned conflict photographer Ashley Gilbertson to document the zombie apocalypse, as seen in The Last of Us on the PlayStation 4.

The Last of Us

My approach was to enter each situation, or level, and work the scene until I was confident I’d gotten the best photograph I could before moving on. It’s the same way I work in real life. Yet, I found it was more difficult to do in a virtual reality because I was expected to fight my way through these levels to get to the next situations.

I initially played the game at home. But after a short time playing it, I noticed I was having very strong reactions in regards to my role as the protagonist: I hated it. When I covered real war, I did so with a camera, not a gun. At home, I’d play for 30 minutes before noticing I had knots in my stomach, that my vision blurred, and then eventually, that I had simply crashed out. I felt like this could well be my last assignment for TIME.

None of the game’s characters show distress, and that to me was bizarre.

Occasionally the characters show anger, though generally they’re nonchalant about the situation they’ve found themselves in.

By the time I finished this assignment, watching the carnage had became easier.

TIME: A War Photographer Embeds Himself Inside a Video Game

Update: A harsh, but I think fair perspective from The Verge: An award-winning war photographer futilely attempts video game photojournalism

The photos, even at their most dramatic and well-shot, are bland.

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Light-based media

TIME embeds a war photographer in a zombie apocalypse (on the PS4)

“I left the experience with a sense that by familiarizing and desensitizing ourselves to violence like this can turn us into zombies. Our lack of empathy and unwillingness to engage with those involved in tragedy stems from our comfort with the trauma those people are experiencing.” — Ashley Gilbertson

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Vincent Debanne, Battleship

Battleship is a photo series by artist Vincent Debanne:

“I show this gathering of yachts as a naval battle, because that’s what it is, a balance of power, a fight. Photomontage gives me the opportunity to reveal, to exaggerate this underlying violence, the violence of economic war.”

“My photo series always play with realism: the documentary side of my images is essential. It has to be plausible at first sight. That’s because my work is not fanciful but seeks to interrogate reality, often in a sociological and political perspective. It engages in a dialectical relationship with reality.”

(via Creative Applications)

Shape of things to come

Battleships for the super rich

Vincent Debanne uses image manipulation to turn luxury yachts into formidable warships and the bays of Antibes and of St-Tropez into theaters of war, while also providing a commentary on some of our world’s current economic, social and political issues.

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Dinosauroids - Color test

The Dinosauroids is a fascinating concept being explored by artist Simon Roy (deviantART, Blogger, tumblr) based on the premise that the dinosaur-killing Chicxulub asteroid misses Earth:

However, the resulting world is not simply a long-lived cretaceous paradise – the Deccan Traps still flooded the sky with ash and changed the climate and atmosphere, killing off most, if not all, of the great dinosaurs. The survivors of such an event, however, are a handful of small therapods, mammals, birds, and even a few pterosaurs.

While our ancestors developed the hand-axe and honed their stone-throwing skills to scavenge kills, the saurian’s ancestors were developing more and more advanced pointy sticks.

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Humans and other animals

The Dinosauroids

The Dinosauroids is a fascinating concept being explored by artist Simon Roy based on the premise that the dinosaur-killing Chicxulub asteroid misses Earth, but the changing climate still wipes out most of the great dinosaurs leaving the world to a handful of small therapods, mammals, birds, and even a few pterosaurs.

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In the summer of 2004, IKEA decided to change the way they produced their product images. They made the first tentative moves toward CG rendered, rather than photographic, images. Ten years later they have a bank of 25,000 models which they use to create around 75% of their product images.

Computer generated Bertil chair

IKEAs first CG piece of furniture: the “Bertil” chair

The IKEA team didn’t feel there was anything wrong with traditional photography, quality-wise. Like any company, they just wanted to make things easier for the team to work on.

About 35% of all of IKEAs room images are also fully CG.

Martin Enthed, IT Manager IKEAs in-house communication agency: “The most expensive and complicated things we have to create and shoot are kitchens. From both an environmental and time point of view, we don’t want to have to ship in all those white-goods from everywhere, shoot them and then ship them all back again. And unfortunately, kitchens are one of those rooms that differ very much depending on where you are in the world. A kitchen in the US will look very different to a kitchen in Japan, for example, or in Germany. So you need lots of different layouts in order to localise the kitchen area in brochures. Very early on we created around 200 CG exchanges versions for 50 photographed kitchens in 2008, with the products we had – and I think everyone began to understand the real possibilities.”

CG Society: Building 3D with Ikea

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Around 75% of all IKEA’s product images are computer generated

‘When IKEA started to look at creating more than product images in 3D a few years ago, they already had a set look and feel for IKEA pictures. They wanted to keep the sense of reality and the feel of a “lived in” environment when moving over to digital workflow. They didn’t want their customers to see or even more importantly feel any difference.’ — Kirsty Parkin, CG Society

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Women as Background Decoration: Part 2 – Tropes vs Women in Video Games

This is the second episode exploring the Women as Background Decoration trope in video games. In this installment we expand our discussion to examine how sexualized female bodies often occupy a dual role as both sexual playthings and the perpetual victims of male violence.

A trip down the anti-feminist rabbit hole →