Other Places is a series celebrating beautiful video game worlds.

A tour of the space station Sevastopol from the new Alien: Isolation…

(There’s also one of the USCSS Nostromo.)

The wild wests of Red Dead Redemption…

The bleak City 17 from Half-Life 2…

The fantastical province of Skyrim

The vast Aperture Science labs from Portal 2…

The post-apocalyptic Mojave Wasteland from Fallout: New Vegas…

And of course, San Andreas from Grand Theft Auto V…

Plus many more.

While these videos are quite wonderful, it’s apparent how much of the character of these places is lost without the sound design. The worlds seem much more hollow without the NPC background chatter in Skyrim, the strange animal noises in Red Dead Redemption, the constant propaganda broadcasts of City 17 and so on. GTAV’s San Andreas seems particularly lifeless compared to the game.

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Other Places

A series celebrating beautiful video game worlds

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Onion Pi

Feel like someone is snooping on you? Browse anonymously anywhere you go with the Onion Pi Tor proxy. This is fun weekend project that uses a Raspberry Pi, a USB WiFi adapter and Ethernet cable to create a small, low-power and portable privacy Pi.

Using it is easy-as-pie. First, plug the Ethernet cable into any Internet provider in your home, work, hotel or conference/event. Next, power up the Pi with the micro USB cable to your laptop or to the wall adapter. The Pi will boot up and create a new secure wireless access point called Onion Pi. Connecting to that access point will automatically route any web browsing from your computer through the anonymizing Tor network.

See also:

Life on the Internet

Onion Pi: Use a Raspberry Pi as a Tor proxy

A fun weekend project that uses a Raspberry Pi, a USB WiFi adapter and Ethernet cable to create a small, low-power and portable privacy Pi.

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Crowd control infographic

Check out the graph along the bottom showing the number of significant protests worldwide over time. I’d like to investigate that a bit more, the only source they provide for this whole infographic is ‘SCMP research’.

This is interesting too:

Cause or effect?

Are the police only arresting, pepper spraying and teargassing protestors when violence erupts, or is it possible that these actions are triggering violence? A bit of both perhaps.

Shape of things to come

Crowd control inforgaphic

“From time to time, governments across the world need to control crowds, demonstrations and riots. Here we take a close look at the means available for law enforcement and the lates developments of the protests in Hong Kong.”

Gallery

Glenn Greenwald: Why privacy matters

Glenn Greenwald was one of the first reporters to see — and write about — the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States’ extensive surveillance of private citizens. In this searing talk, Greenwald makes the case for why you need to care about privacy, even if you’re “not doing anything you need to hide.”

(via Boing Boing)

Humans and other animals

World War I: The Seminal Tragedy

Extra Credits is an excellent series of videos about computer game design presented in a very entertaining and accessible way.

Occasionally Extra Credits turn their attention to history for a series called Extra History. First they looked at The Punic Wars, and now they’ve just finished an excellent four part series on the events that led to World War I.

You can support Extra History on Pateron.

Chapter 1: The Concert of Europe

“The world hinges on small things.”

The Concert of Europe held the continent together for years after the Napoleonic Wars, but as the leadership of great nations weakened over time, the stage was set for a colossal tragedy.

Watch parts 2, 3 and 4 →

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